Project SC 106359 PHI: Disaster Risk Management Assessment

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Contract 124020

05 January 2016

Draft Final Report

Prepared by Hermilando D. Aberia for the Asian Development Bank

DISCLAIMER. The views expressed in this report are that of the author, and do not necessarily reflect that of the Asian Development Bank or the Department of Social Welfare and Development.

Contents

  1. Abbreviationsand Acronyms. 4
  2. Introduction. 5
  1. Framework for DRM and Post-Disaster Recovery Assessment in Yolanda-Affected Areas. 6
  1. Status of Post-Disaster Recovery Projects. 19
  1. Challenges, Lessons Learned and Opportunities. 30
  1. Conclusion and Recommendations: Next Steps for DRM and Yolanda Recovery. 35
  2. Annexes. 38
  1. Bibliography. 104

 

List of Tables

Table 1. Capacity Building Trainings on DRRM under the NDRRM Plan. 12

Table 2. Table comparing government and UNDP permanent housing programs. 19

Table 3. Completed, ongoing, and planned post-disaster projects supported by NGOs/INGOs. 21

Table 4. Number of Affected Population and Number of Beneficiaries. 24

Table 5. Government livelihood projects for Yolanda-affected areas in Region 8. 25

Table 6. Number of Families Living in Transitional Shelters and Permanent Housing in Region 8. 27

Table 7. Implementation Status of Government Permanent Housing Program in Region 8. 28

Table 8. Steps for the Monitoring RDRRMP Process. 46

 

List of Figures

Figure 1. Basic Structure of NDRRMC under RA 10121. 10

Figure 2. Goal of Each Thematic Area under N/RDRRM Plan. 10

Figure 3. The N/RDRRMC Structure with Memo 79. 15

Figure 4. Infographics developed by NEDA summarizing updates on Yolanda CRRP implementation. 20

Figure 5. Number of Families Living in Transitional Shelters in Region 8. 26

Figure 6. Number of Families Living in Permanent Housing in Region 8. 26

Figure 7. UN Agency-specific Presence and Interventions along the DRRM Continuum.. 35

 

Abbreviationsand Acronyms

ADB Asian Development Bank
AF Additional Fund
CBDRRM Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction Management
CCA Climate Change Adaptation
CCC Climate Change Commission
Y/CRRP Yolanda/Comprehensive Rehabilitation and Recovery Plan
DILG Department of the Interior and Local Government
DOST Department of Science and Technology
DP Disaster Preparedness
DPWH Department of Public Works and Highways
DND Department of National Defense
DRM Disaster Risk Management
DRR/M Disaster Risk Reduction / Management
DSWD Department of Social Welfare and Development
EMY Extended Mission for Yolanda-affected Areas
FAO Food and Agriculture Organization
FO Field Office
HUDCC Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council
IASC Inter-Agency Standing Committee
IDP Internally Displaced Persons
ILO International Labour Organization
I/NGO International / Non-Government Organization
IOM International Organization for Migration
LDRRMC Local Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council
LGU Local Government Unit/s
NEDA National Economic Development Authority
NHA National Housing Authority
OCD Office of Civil Defense
OCHA UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
OPARR Office of the Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery
PDNA Post Disaster Needs Assessment
PDRRMF Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction Management Framework
PDRRMS Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction Management System
PhCO Philippine Country Office
RDNA Rapid Damage Assessment and Needs Analysis
RO Regional Office
TOR Terms of Reference
UNDAF United Nations Development Assistance Framework
UNDP United Nations Development Programme
UN Habitat United Nations Human Settlements Programme
UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund
UNIDO United Nations Industrial Development Organization
UNFPA United Nations Population Fund
UNRCO United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office
WASH Water, Sanitation and Hygiene
WFP World Food Program
WB World Bank
YPMO Yolanda Project Monitoring Office

 

Introduction                                             

  1. On November 8, 2013, Super Typhoon Yolanda (internationally known as Haiyan) destroyed many areas in central Philippines. Yolanda has been recorded as the strongest storm ever recorded at landfall. It claimed over 7,000 casualties. It displaced more than 4 million people. An estimated 1.1 million homes were either damaged or totally flattened. The provinces of Leyte and Samar in the Eastern Visayas (Region 8) were among the worst affected areas.

About this Report

  1. This report has been produced to help the Philippine Country Office of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) gain a better understanding of disaster risk management (DRM) and the on-going recovery activities in the Yolanda-affected areas. It has three main parts: one, framework for assessment; two, review of DRM in Region 8; three, review of rehabilitation and recovery activities also in Region 8; and, four, recommendations.
  2. The framework for assessment looks at the Philippine laws and policies framing DRM implementation. Review of DRM assesses how these policies have been applied in Region 8. Review of Yolanda recovery activities is a summary evaluation of ongoing projects in Region 8, including an analysis of challenges and opportunities that have emerged. The concluding part provides recommendations for DRM and management of recovery projects. These recommendations are intended to support implementation of ongoing ADB projects as well as in the preparation of the next Country Partnership Strategy (CPS).
  3. Although Typhoon Yolanda affected several regions in central Philippines, this report, unless specified, refers to Region 8 (Eastern Visayas) when it talks about Yolanda-affected areas.
  4. Some terms are used interchangeably in the report. These include, among other things, Disaster Risk Management (DRM) and Disaster Risk Reduction Management (DRRM). DRM is the term used in the Terms of Reference (Annex 1) for this assignment. DRRM is the term used by Republic Act (RA) 10121.

Objectives of the Assignment

  1. The objective of the assignment is to assist the Extended Mission for Yolanda-affected Areas (EMY) and Philippine Country Office (PhCO) with a deeper understanding of the outstanding challenges in disaster risk management (DRM) and post-disaster recovery in the Typhoon Yolanda affected areas. The consultant will be required to study the various ongoing activities in livelihood recovery, community disaster preparedness and resilience.
  2. In addition, with the current country partnership strategy (CPS) for the Philippines, 2011–2016, nearing completion, the work of the national DRM specialist on the Typhoon Yolanda affected areas may be used as one of the inputs to the preparation of the next CPS.
  3. EMY/PhCO needs the services of a national disaster risk management specialist to assist EMY and the Philippines Country Team. The services of the national consultant will be required for 30 person-days intermittently, starting on December 2015, and to be completed by January 2016.

Scope of Work

  1. The assessment will consist of a desk study and analysis of secondary information and data, as well as consultation with key stakeholders. The assessment will provide EMY and PhCO with (i) comprehensive overview of climate change and DRM challenges and opportunities and (ii) future directions for possible ADB assistance in the Typhoon Yolanda affected areas; (iii) lessons learned from the Typhoon Yolanda recovery that can be used to inform the preparation of the next Philippine CPS.

Approach and Methodology

  1. To achieve the objectives of the assignment as stated in the TOR, the assessment shall apply the DRM framework in the Philippines. Basically this framework shall consist of DRM-related laws, regulations and policies. Examination shall move from the national to the local contexts. The local level refers to the Yolanda-affected areas in Region 8.
  2. Review of emergency response and post-disaster activities shall be discussed within the context of DRM in the Philippines. This is in keeping with the thematic areas identified by existing Philippine laws on DRM.
  3. In conducting the DRM assessment, the consultant shall make use of available secondary information to identify and determine the Philippine’s DRRM challenges and opportunities. These challenges and opportunities can both be internal and external to the country, its government and non-government agencies, as well as its local communities. The consultant shall review reports on implementation of Yolanda response and recovery projects, key DRM documents, and validate them through key informant/group interviews and project site observations.
  4. The consultant applied the following methods in conducting the assessment:
    1. Review of secondary information/data consisting, among other things, of project documents/ reports, DRR documents/reports (please see Annex 6 and Bibliography). One limitation of this assessment is that updated and comprehensive data on activities conducted by local DRM offices are not available. Another limitation has something to do with documentation of post-disaster recovery projects, particularly with respect to inputs provided by international organizations. While NEDA—taking on the work done by the UNRCO Liaison Teams with regard to monitoring of INGO recovery activities—continues to provide updates on Yolanda projects, its data are being supplied by these agencies themselves. Projects implemented by agencies that do not supply data to these updates are not reflected in the reports.
    2. Analysis of secondary information/data.
    3. To partly address the limitation mentioned above (para 13.a), random project site observation and validation, as well as consultations through meetings, individual or group interviews, with key stakeholders, were conducted. The sites include resettlement sites in Tacloban City and Eastern Samar, livelihood project sites in Eastern Samar and Leyte, and social services sites in Samar.
    4. Consolidation of findings and writing of report/s.

Framework for DRM and Post-Disaster Recovery Assessment in Yolanda-Affected Areas

  1. The Philippines has a robust framework for DRM. A lively mix of laws, regulations and institutions that address DRM exists. The government has also addressed Yolanda-specific issues with new policies. Furthermore, there are also international agreements and standards that help frame DRM in the country.

Policy Framework for DRM

  1. The basic framework for DRM in the Philippines is provided by RA 10121, referred to below as “the Act”, also known as the National DRRM Law. RA 10121 provides basis for the establishment of the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction Management System (PDRRMS). It adopts, as a matter of state policy, the following (Congress of the Philippines 2009):
  2. Incorporate internationally accepted principles of disaster risk management in the creation and implementation of national, regional and local sustainable development andpoverty reduction strategles, policies, plans and budgets;
  3. Adopt a disaster risk reduction and management approach that is holistic, comprehensive, integrated, and proactive in lessening the socio-economic and environmental impacts of disasters including climate change, and promote the involvement and participation of all sectors and all stakeholders concerned, at all levels, especially the local community;
  4. Develop, promote, and implement a comprehensive National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (NDRRMP) that aims to strengthen the capacity of the national government and the local government units (LGUs), together with partner stakeholders, to build the disaster resilience of communities, and to institutionalize arrangements and measures for reducing disaster risks, including projected climate risks, and enhancing disaster preparedness and response capabilities at all levels;
  5. Adopt and implement a coherent, comprehensive, integrated, efficient and responsive disaster risk reduction program incorporated in the development plan at various levels of government adhering to the principles of good governance such as transparency and accountability wIthin the context of poverty alleviation and environmental protection;
  6. Mainstream disaster risk reduction and climate change in development processes such as policy formulation, socio-economic development planning, budgeting, and governance, particularly in the areas of environment, agriculture, water, energy, health, education, poverty reduction, land-use and urban planning, and public infrastructure and housing, among others;
  7. Institutionalize the policies, structures, coordination mechanisms and programs with continuing budget/appropriation on disaster risk reduction from national down to local levels towards building a disaster-resiIient nation and communities;
  8. Mainstream disaster risk reduction into the peace process and conflict resolution approaches in order to minimize loss of lives and damage to property, and ensure that communities in conflict zones can immediately go back to their normal lives during periods of intermittent conflicts;
  9. Ensure that disaster risk reduction and climate change measures are gender responsive, sensitIve to indigenous knowledge systems, and respectful of human rIghts;
  10. Recognize the local risk patterns across the country and strengthen the capacity of LGUs for disaster risk reduction and management through decentralized powers, responsibilities, and resources at the regional and local levels;
  11. Recognize and strengthen the capacities of LGUs and communities in mitigating and preparing for, responding to, and recovering from the impact of disasters;
  12. Engage the participatlon of civil society organizations(CSOs), the private sector and volunteers in the government’s disaster risk reduction programs towards complementation of resources and effective delivery of services to the citizenry;
  13. Develop and strengthen the capacitles of vulnerable and marginalized groups to mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from the effects of disasters;
  14. Enhance and implement a program where humanitarian aid workers, communities, health professionals, government aid agencies, donors, and the media are educated and trained on how they can actively support breastfeeding before and during a disaster and/or an emergency; and
  15. Provide maximum care, assistance and services to individuals and families affected by disaster, implement emergency rehabilitation projects to lessen the impact of disaster, and facilitate resumption of normal social and economic activities.
  16. The salient points of RA 10121 are the following:
  17. The basic structure of National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (Sec. 5, also Figure 1, below:

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) is headed by the Secretary of the Department of National Defense (DND) as Chairperson with the Secretary of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) as Vice Chairperson for Disaster Preparedness, the Secretary of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) as Vice Chairperson for Disaster Response, the Secretary of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) as Vice Chairperson for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, and the Director-General of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) as Vice Chairperson for Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery.

  1. Powers and Functions of the NDRRMC (Sec. 6):
  2. Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Organization at the Regional Level (Sec. 10).
  3. Organization at the Local Government Level (Sec. 11).

Headed by Local Chief Executives (LCEs), members of LDRRMCs are:Local Plannmg and Development Officer, Head of the LDRRMO, Head of the Local Social Welfare andDevelopment Office, Head of the Local Health Office, Head of the Local Agriculture Office, Head of the Gender and Development Office,Head of the Local Engineering Office, Head of the Local Veterinary Office, Head of the Local Budget Office, Division Head/Superintendent of Schools of theDepEd, the highest-ranking officer of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) assigned in the area, the ProvincIal Director/City/Municipal Chief of the Philippine National Police (PNP), the Provincial Director/City/Municipal Fire Marshall of the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP), the President of the Association of Barangay Captains (ABC), the Philippine National Red Cross (PNRC), four (4) accredited CSOs, members; and one (1) private sector representative.

The LDRRMC refers to either Provincial DRRMC, City DRRMC, Municipal DRRMC, or Barangay DRRMC.

  1. Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (LDRRMO, Sec. 12).

Key functions of LDRRMCs are:

  • Approve, monitor and evaluate the implementation of the LDRRMPs and regularly review and test the plan consistent with other national and local planning programs;
  • Ensure the integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation into local development plans, programs and budgets as a strategy in sustainable development and poverty reduction;
  • Recommend the implementation of forced or preemptive evacuation of local residents, if necessary; and
  • Convene the local council once every three (3) months or as necessary.

Key functions of LDRRMOs are:

  • Design, program, and coordinate disaster risk reduction and management activitles consistent with the National Council’s standards and guidelines;
  • Facilitate and support risk assessments and contingency planning activities at the local level;
  • Consolidate local disaster risk information which includes natural hazards, vulnerabilities, and climate change risks, and maintain a local risk map;
  • Organize and conduct training, orientation, and knowledge management activities on disaster risk reduction and management at the local level;
  • Operate a multi-hazard early warning system, linked to disaster risk reduction to provide accurate and timely advice to national or local emergency response organizations and to the general public, through diverse mass media, particularly radio, landline communications, and technologies for communication within rural communities;
  • Formulate and implement a comprehensive and integrated LDRRMP in accordance with the national, regional and provincial framework, and policies on disaster risk reduction in close coordination with the local development councils (LDCs);
  • Prepare and submit to the local sanggunian through the LDRRMC and the LDC the annual LDRRMO Plan and budget, the proposed programming of the LDRRMF, other dedicated disaster risk reduction and management resources, and other regular funding source/s and budgetary support of the LDRRMO/BDRRMC;
  • Conduct continuous disaster monitoring and mobilize instrumentalities and entities of the LGUs, CSOs, private groups and organized volunteers, to utilize their facilities and resources for the protection and preservation of life and properties during emergencies in accordance with existing policies and procedures;
  • Identify, assess and manage the hazards, vulnerabilities and risks that may occur in their locality;
  • Disseminate information and raise public awareness about those hazards, vulnerabilities and risks, their nature, effects, early warning signs and counter-measures;
  • Identify and implement cost-effective risk reduction measures/strategies;
  • Maintain a database of human resource, equipment, directories, and location of critical infrastructures and their capacities such as hospitals and evacuation centers;
  • Develop, strengthen and operationalize mechanisms for partnership or networking with the private sector, CSOs,and volunteer groups;
  • Take all necessary steps on a continuing basis to maintain, provide, or arrange the provision of, or to otherwise make available, suitably-trained and competent personnel for effective civil defense and disaster risk reduction and management in its area;
  • Organize, train, equip and supervise the local emergency response teams and the ACDVs, ensuring that humanitarian aid workers are equipped with basic skills to assist mothers to breastfeed;
  • Respond to and manage the adverse effects of emergencies and carry out recovery activities in the affected area, ensuring that there is an efficient mechanism for immediate delivery of food, shelter and medical supplies for women and children, endeavor to create a special place where internally-displaced mothers can find help with breastfeeding, feed and care for their babies and give support to each other;
  • Within its area, promote and raise public awareness of and compliance with this Act and legislative provisions relevant to the purpose of this Act;
  • Serve as the secretariat and executive arm of the LDRRMC;
  • Coordinate other disaster risk reduction and management activities;
  • Establish linkage/network with other LGUs for disaster risk reduction and emergency response purposes;
  • Recommend through the LDRRMC the enactment of local ordinances consistent with the requirements of this Act;
  • Implement policies, approved plans and programs of the LDRRMC consistent with the policies and guidelines laid down in this Act;
  • Establish a Provincial/City/Municipal/Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Operations Center;
  • Prepare and submit, through the LDRRMC and the Local Development Council (LDC), the report on the utilization of the LDRRMF and other dedicated disaster risk reduction and management resources to the local Commission on Audit (COA), copy furnished the regional director of the OCD and the Local Government Operations Officer of the DILG; and
  • Act on other matters that may be authorized by the LDRRMC.
  1. Mechanism for International Humanitarian Assistance (Sec. 18).
  • The importation and donation of food, clothing, medicine and equipment for relief and recovery and other disaster management and recovery-related supplies is hereby authorized in accordance with Section 105 of the Tariff and Customs Code of the Philippines, as amended, and the prevailing provisions of the General Appropriations Act covering national internal revenue taxes and import duties of national and local government agencies; and
  • Importations and donations under this section shall be considered as importation by and/or donation to the NDRRMC, subject to the approval of the Office of the President.
  1. Philippine DRM and International Agreements on DRR and CCA. The Philippines is signatory to several international agreements on DRRM and CCA. These agreements include the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015, UN Policy for Post-Conflict Employment Creation, Income Generation and Reintegration, the UN Humanitarian Response Cluster System, and Agenda 21. More recently, the Philippines signed the 17 SDGs (Annex 2e), Sendai Framework (March 2015) and Paris CoP21 Agreement (December 2015).

Figure 1. Basic Structure of NDRRMC under RA 10121

Figure 2. Goal of Each Thematic Area under N/RDRRM Plan

Note: The NDRRMP goals are to be achieved by 2028 through 14 objectives, 24 outcomes, 56 outputs, and 93 activities.

Source: RDRRM Plan, OCD Region 8

DRM in Yolanda-Affected Areas                 

Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (RDRRM) Plan 2012-2016

  1. The RDRRMP like the NDRRMP covers four thematic areas, namely, (1) Disaster Prevention and Mitigation; (2) Disaster Preparedness; (3) Disaster Response; and (4) Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery, which correspond to the structure of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC).
  2. The RDRRMP is consistent with the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan and National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Framework (NDRRMF), which serves as “the principal guide to disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) efforts to the country….” The RDRRMP envisions overall goal of “Resilient, safer and secured Eastern Visayas through an empowered citizenry”. It conveys a paradigm shift from reactive to proactive DRRM wherein men and women have increased their awareness and understanding of DRRM, with the end in view of increasing people’s resilience and decreasing their vulnerabilities.
  3. The RDRRMP like the NDRRMP sets down the expected outcomes, outputs, key activities, indicators, lead agencies, implementing partners and timelines under each of the four distinct yet mutually in support of attaining the region’s overall goal in each thematic area. The goal of each thematic area lead to the attainment of the country’s overall DRRM vision, as graphically shown in Figure 2.

Priority Projects

  1. The RDRRM Plan has identified priority projects. They include, among other things, the following (Annex 2a):
  2. Development of Local DRRM plans;
  3. Development of IEC and advocacy materials on RA 10121, DRRM and CCA;
  4. Development of guidelines on Communications and information protocol before, during and after disasters, creation of DRRM teams, criteria/standards for local flood early warning systems, evacuation, infrastructure redesign and/or modifications, manual of operations of disaster operations centers;
  5. Development of tools on DRRM and CCA mainstreaming in the national and local-level planning, Damage and Needs Assessment (DANA) and Post-DANA, psychosocial concerns;
  6. Establishment of local flood early warning systems (through integrated and sustainable management river basins and water sheds, End-to-End Early Warning Systems in Provinces of Leyte, Southern Leyte, Biliran, Samar, Eastern Samar and Northern Samar;
  7. Establishment of local DRRM Councils and Offices and their operations centers, as prescribed by RA 10121;
  8. Conduct of inventory of existing DRRM and CCA resources and services;
  9. Development and implementation of DRRM and CCA activities using 5% of government agency’s allocation from the annual national budget or General Appropriations Act (GAA);
  10. Hazard and risk mapping in the most high-risk areas in the region;
  11. Institutional capability program on DRRM and CCA for decision makers, public sector employees, and key stakeholders;
  12. Mainstreaming DRRM and CCA;
  13. PDNA capacity building for regional line agencies, and local offices; and
  14. Review of the following: Building Code and integrate DRRM and CCA; Executive Order No. 72 s. 1993, which provides for the preparation and implementation of the CLUPs of local government units; Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA No. 10121; Various environmental policies (i.e., EO No. 26, etc) to integrate DRRM and CCA.

Capacity Building for Local DRRMCs

  1. The OCD, in collaboration with DRRMC Vice Chairs, conducts trainings for local DRRMCs. These trainings include Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction Management (CBDRRM), DRRM for LDRRMCs, Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA), Rapid Damanage Assessment and Needs Analysis (RDANA), SPHERE, etc.(OCD 2016). Summary descriptions of these trainings are presented in Table 1, below:

Table 1. Capacity Building Trainings on DRRM under the NDRRM Plan

Title/ Description of Training Main Content/Modules Objectives Participants
CBDRRM—a process in which at-risk communities are actively engaged in the identification, analysis, treatment, monitoring, and evaluation of disaster risks in order to reduce the vulnerabilities and enhance capacities. ·      The Philippine Context and Importance of CBDRRM (The Local and Philippine Disaster Situation, The Local Disaster Situation, The National Disaster Situation

·      Basic Concepts on Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) and Climate Change Adapatation (CCA), The CBDRRM as an approach to DRRM and CCA, The Legal Bases for CBDRRM [Republic Act 10121, Republic Act 9729, Other DRRM- and CCAM-Related Laws])

·      Steps in Conducting CBDRRM (Community Risk Assessment, Participatory DRRM Planning, Formation and Strengthening of the BDRRMC)

·      Preparedness, Prevention, and Mitigation Mechanisms (Reviewing the Definition and Importance of Prevention, Mitigation, and Preparedness; National Warning Systems to Help Families and Communities in Disaster Preparedness, Prevention and Mitigation; Community and Family Preparedness, Prevention and Mitigation Mechanisms Per Hazard)

·      Disaster Response Mechanisms and Preparations for Rehabilitation and Recovery (Disaster Response, Key Roles and Responsibilities During Disaster Response, Evacuation Camp/Center Management, Relief Delivery Operations, Providing First Aid, Basic Water Safety and Rescue, Management of the Dead and the Missing, Psychosocial Support)

·      Action Planning (Identification of immediate actions, Setting the timeframe, Identifying the persons/committess in-charge of the tasks and resources needed)

(See also Annex 2d)

·      Explain the importance and key concepts of CBDRRM; and the laws supporting it;

·      Describe and undergo the key steps in the CBDRRM process;

·      Develop and/or identify the necessary community and family DRRM mechanisms before, during, and after a disaster; and

·      Determine the immediate actions to take to fully implement these DRRM mechanisms.

 

LDRRMC/O members
DRRM for LDRRMCs—basic training for LDRRMCs to be informed of the DRRM trends and be able to fully understand DRRM ·      Learning from Past Disasters

·      RA 10121: Legal and Institutional Framework of the PDRRMS

·      Sourcing, Utilization, and Management of DRRM Resources

·      Roles, Responsibilities, and Powers of LDRRMCs

·      Overview of Disaster Risk Assessment

·      Hazard Awareness – Weather Hazards, Landslide, EQ, Volcano, Tsunami

·      Introduction to Incident Command System (ICS)

·      Introduction to LDRRM Plan

·      Introduction to Contingency Planning

·    Understand the concepts of DRRM as well as internalize their roles and functions as provided by law.  They shall also be able to identify and prioritize various hazards and risks that may pose threat to communities;

·    Appreciate the proper utilization of DRRM Funds and other related funds; and

·    Understand and appreciate planning and programming for Disaster Preparedness, Response and Mitigation.

LDRRMC members
PDNA—a multi-sector and multi-disciplinary structured approach for assessing disaster impacts and prioritizing recovery and reconstruction needs. ·      Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery in the PDRRMS

·      Introduction to PDNA

·      Damage and Loss Assessment

·      Human Recovery Needs Assessment

·      Recovery Framework

·      The PDNA Sectors

·      The PDNA Steps

·      The PDNA Teams

·      Preparations for a PDNA Mission

·      Taxonomy of a PDNA Report

·      Guidance Notes Review Session

·      Tabletop Exercise on using PDNA Guidance Notes

·      Administrative Preparations

·      Field Assessment Proper

·      Finalization of PDNA Report

·      Presentation of PDNA findings

·      Demonstrate understanding on PDNA as a tool for disaster rehabilitation and recovery;

·      Identify the steps involved in conducting PDNA, the operational terminologies used, the preparations and other relevant processes; and

·      Experience the conduct of PDNA through tabletop and field exercises.

 

LDRRMC member agencies; multi-sector
RDANA—provides a quick “snapshot” of the disaster situation; determines the type and extent of damages brought about by a disaster, including its secondary threats, the critical needs of the affected population, and the local response capacities. ·      Introduction to RDANA

·      General Features of RDANA

·      Coordination and Communication

·      Phases of Mobilization and Organization

·      Getting Ready for RDANA

·      Pre-, In- and Post-Mission

·      Assessment Process

·      Secondary and Primary Data

·      Reminders for the Simulation Exercise

·      Briefing with the LDRRMC

·      RDANA Simulation Exercise

·      Reporting and Presentation of Outputs

·      Identify the objectives, processes and principles used in RDANA;

·      Explain the coordinating mechanisms between the actors involved in RDANA;

·      Determine the procedures involved before, during and after an RDANA mission;

·      Develop the skills needed to assess information on disaster-stricken sites; and

·      Apply appropriate RDANA methods in a simulated disaster impacted site.

LDRRMC/O members
SPHERE—oneof the capacity building activities which is an initiative of several humanitarian organizations to determine and promote standards by which the global community responds to the plight of people affected by disasters. ·      The Sphere Story and The Humanitarian Charter

·      Protection Principles

·      Minimum Core Standards

·      WASH in the Field

·      Trainers Tips, Experiential Learning & Training Techniques

·      WASH Minimum Standard

·      Food Security & Nutrition in the Field

·      Food Security & Nutrition Minimum Standards

·      Settlement, Shelter & NFI in the Field

·      Settlement, Shelter & NFI Minimum Standard

·      Health in the Field

·      Health Minimum Standards

·      Sphere and the Future

·       To introduce the trainers the core principles found in the Humanitarian Charter (HC) and the international legal instruments on which they are based and to explain the meaning and hierarchical relationship of Sphere Charter, Protection Principles, Core Standards, Key Actions, Key Indicators, and Guidance Notes

·      To update trainers on the new 2011 version of the Sphere Guide on the Humanitarian Charter and International Standards in Humanitarian Response

LDRRMC/O members

Source: OCD

  1. Annex 3 shows that OCD Region has conducted 15 capacity building trainings for local DRRMC members and DRRMO staff members in 2015. These trainings included PDNA, Basic DRRM Orientation, CBDRRM, and Incident Command System (ICS). However, data on capacility building activities conducted by local DRRMCs/DRRMOs themselves are not available, including those conducted/organized by lead agencies of sub-committees of the RDRRMC.[1]

Cross-Cutting Concerns

  1. The RDRRMP recognizes that certain concerns cut across the four thematic areas. These include health, human-induced disasters, gender mainstreaming, environmental protection, cultural sensitivity or indigenous practices, and the rights-based approach. Lastly, R.A. 10121 provides that the OCD shall utilize the RDRRMP as the instrument by which the government ensures consistency of DRRM measures with the physical framework, social and economic and environmental plans of communities, cities, municipalities and provinces.

Yolanda-specific DRM Policies

  1. The extent of the devastation brought about by Yolanda prompted President Benigno S. Aquino III to declare a state of national calamity through Proclamation No. 682 on 11 November 2013. All departments and other concerned government agencies initiated rescue, relief, rehabilitation, and recovery work in accordance with pertinent government operational plans and directives. Alongside government efforts, local and international organizations and volunteers came together to extend assistance to the Yolanda survivors and took part in what would be one of the greatest concerted relief and recovery efforts witnessed in recent history.(NEDA n.d.)
  2. On 6 December 2013 the President of the Philippines issued Memorandum Order 62, appointing a Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery “to unify the efforts of government and other agencies involved in the rehabilitation and recovery efforts,” and creating the Office of the Presidential Assistnat for Rehabilitation and Recovery (OPARR). The OPARR was also mandated to “act as over-all manager and coordinator of rehabilitation, recovery, and reconstruction efforts of government departments, agencies, and instrumentalities in the affected areas.”(Office of the President 2013)
  3. Also in December 2013, NEDA issued a document called “Reconstruction Assistance on Yolanda (RAY): Build Back Better.” RAY aimed to guide both national and international intervention in terms of relief, recovery and reconstruction. It structured interventions in various sectors, including shelter and resettlement, industry and services (including livelihoods) and social protection. Needs were categorized as critical (immediate action required in the six months following the disaster); short-term (2014); and medium-term (2015–2017). This was followed by the “RAY: Implementation for Results,” also known as RAY2. RAY2 presented an overall results framework for monitoring progress consistent with Philippine Development Plan. It also highlighted key policy and program initiatives under implementation or consideration by four clusters covering 1) livelihoods and business development; 2) housing and resettlement; 3) social services; and 4) infrastructure (NEDA 2013).
  4. Building on RAY, OPARR submitted the 8,000-page, 8-volume CRRP to the President for approval. President Aquino approved the CRRP on 1 August 2014. The CRRP identified recovery projects at LGU, provincial and national levels, constituting a total of 18,400 projects with a combined budget of over Php 167 billion. The projects are classified into four “recovery clusters”: infrastructure, livelihood, resettlement and social services.
  5. With the aim of easing bureaucratic gridlocks that attended CRRP implementation, the national government issued Administrative Order 44 in October 2014. AO 44 addressed the need to streamline, coordinate and fast track the processes and requirements for the issuance of permits, certifications, clearances and licenses for housing and resettlement projects in the Yolanda-affected areas by concerned national and local government agencies. (Official Gazette 2014)
  6. In April 2015, the national government issued Memorandum Order 79, abolishing the OPARR and transferring its functions to the NEDA (Office of the President 2015). The OPARR functions included output monitoring for government Yolanda-related projects, which effectively expands NEDA’s monitoring role under the existing government’s project monitoring structure.[2] For this purpose, NEDA has now established the Yolanda Project Monitoring Office (YPMO) in its Central Office and Regional Offices in Region 6, 7 and 8.

Figure 3. The N/RDRRMC Structure with Memo 79

Government and Non-government Response to Yolanda

  1. In the early days and months that followed the landfall of Yolanda, the Government, with help from non-government (both local and international) as well as private sectors, distributed food and relief supplies. It also focused on providing medical care for the injured and on the reopening ports and airports, clearing roads, re-establishing electricity and communications (NEDA 2013).
  2. While relief operations continued, the government geared itself up for recovery and reconstruction. With RAY, its focus was on promoting“building back better” strategies and establishing standards. For infrastructure (roads, ports, airports and public facilities, such as schools and markets) and resettlement sectors, this required construction of more resistant housing and ensuring that reconstruction took place in areas that are less prone to storm surge. Construction designs needed approval of the DPWH, among other protocols. The government also needed to review zoning standards, particularly in relation to identification of hazard zones.
  3. For social services, government and non-government partners provided education, health, food security and environmental protection services. DSWD, the lead agency, also distributed cash for individuals or families whose houses were either partially or totally destroyed.
  4. Livelihood programs included support to agriculture, fisheries and small and medium businesses, to “emergency employment,” skills training and a wide variety of other projects. The infrastructure cluster also supported projects related to livelihoods, such as farm-to-market roads and fisheries infrastructure. The private sector contributed almost USD 300 million in assistance, ranging from the provision of over 1 million business loans, to the donation of 10,000 fishing boats and over 9,000 temporary houses, alongside a wide variety of other activities.Private sector support included in-kind donations; cash donations to the government, international agencies and NGOs; and partnerships with local governments. Churches and a diverse range of community-based NGOs have also been critical, local drivers of the reconstruction process.(Angela Sherwood 2015) Also see more details in Annex 5.

International Responses

  1. The UN and international development organizations have provided comprehensive support for populations affected by Yolanda. The UN Agencies had assumed a big role in delivering emergency relief assistance, some which–UNDP, UNICEF, FAO, among others—continued to implement recovery projects until today. On coordination, the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), led by OCHA, and in collaboration with the Philippine government and the international humanitarian community, had also assumed a high-profile (and sometimes disputed) role until August 2014, when the government declared an end to the emergency phase and a full shift to recovery.
  2. Yolanda-affected areas received tremendous international—bilateral, multilateral and non-governmental—support. Within days of the disaster, numerous foreign military contingents were supporting humanitarian operations. They provided equipment, logistics and relief supplies. Support came in the form of cash assistance and supplies (food and non-food items, tents housing materials, etc). DBM data show that of the total amount of Php73.3B in foreign pledges, international and local NGOs, multilateral organizations, etc., received Php14.8B (Florencio Abad 2015). Donors included foreign governments, multilateral organizations and aid agencies, private corporations and individuals. Relatives of victims living abroad have also significantly contributed to meeting their survival needs.
  3. Yolanda’s devastation was so massive that the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC) of the United Nations deployed its Level 3 emergency mechanism in natural disaster.[3]
  4. The Strategic Response Plan (SRP), the common fundraising mechanism of UN agencies and many international NGOs, initially requested USD 308 million, and later revised that figure to USD 776 million, to cover humanitarian and recovery needs for the period November 2013–November 2014. The SRP estimated a total affected population of 14 million people, and targeted 3 million among them for assistance.Of the USD 776 million requested, a total of USD 468 million was raised and spent by international agencies and international NGOs, representing just over 60 per cent of requested funds.Food security and agriculture (USD 182 million), emergency shelter (USD 173million) and early recovery and livelihoods (USD 115 million) represented the three largest sectorial requests, and were 72.3 per cent, 46.7 per cent and 28.5 per cent funded, respectively. (Angela Sherwood 2015)
  5. The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank were also heavily involved in relief and reconstruction, with many of their interventions having an impact on social protection, housing and durable solutions prospects. As of this writing, the World Bank had pledged over USD 1 billion in loans, grants and other assistance in the aftermath of Haiyan and the Asian Development Bank had also committed over USD 1 billion, in a mix of loans, grants, budget support and other assistance.[4]

Coordination Support for Recovery

  1. On OPARR’s request, the UN continued to provide support for enhancing its coordination role with international partners to deliver and integrate work, build capacity and pursue results. Within the UN system, the UN Resident Coordinator (RC) has the coordination mandate in the development arena, and a transition occurred from the HCT to the RC system as response moved from relief to recovery and development. RC-anchored but field-based liaison teams were established in three areas: UNICEF in Tacloban, Leyte (Region 8), UNDP in Borongan, E Samar (Region 8), and FAO in Capiz (Region 6).
  2. The Liaison Teams had 3 basic objectives, viz:
  3. To facilitate the interface and information sharing of UN agencies and partners with national recovery management structures, with special attention on coordination concerns involved in resettlement, livelihood, shelter, and protection;
  4. To facilitate greater consistency and complementarity of UN-supported recovery interventions, with particular emphasis on capacity development initiatives; and
  5. To provide a forum for the identification of issues that may require collective advocacy through the RC, e.g. issues in the implementation of the Comprehensive Rehabilitation and Recovery Plan (CRRP), including the management of remaining humanitarian needs, if any.[5]

Transitions Involving the Government and the UN

  1. While the UN has transitioned from OCHA to UNRC-field based teams in the area of coordinating relief and recovery activities undertaken by UN Agencies and other humanitarian and development partners, the government has likewise transitioned from OPARR to NEDA insofar as coordinating and monitoring CRRP activities was concerned.
  2. The NEDA worked with the recovery clusters established by OPARR:
  3. Infrastructure Cluster, chaired by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
  4. Resettlement Cluster, chaired by the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC)[6]
  5. Social Services Cluster, chaired by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)
  6. Livelihood Cluster, chaired by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)
  7. Support Cluster, co-chaired by the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) and NEDA
  8. One issue that has gained traction was on providing support to NEDA in terms of capacity building, technical assistance and further streamlining the coordination mechanism. Memo 79 allows NEDA to create a Yolanda Project Management Office (YPMO) that would perform the functions assigned to it. However, while NEDA has the capacity to monitor government projects, it does not have the same capacity to monitor Yolanda-related projects undertaken by UN Agencies and international partners.
  9. Initial steps had been undertaken to fill the gap. By the time the UNRC Liaison Teams in Region 8 prepared to exit, a transition process has been activated to enable the YPMO at NEDA to assume the UNRC teams’ functions. The NEDA has continued to convey the partners’ meeting, with the UNDP, which will continue to operate in the area until 2017, expected to co-chair it. In Eastern Samar, this function has been assumed by the Provincial DRRMO under the leadership of the Vice Governor, with support also coming from UNDP.
  10. On information management, the team has mentored and conducted trainings not only for YPMO but also for regional as well as local government IT focal persons. The monthly updating of the agency mapping data that the Tacloban Liaison Team performed is now being undertaken by the YPMO.

Planning and Implementation of Post-Disaster Recovery Projects

  1. OPARR formulated the Comprehensive Rehabilitation and Recovery Plan (CRRP) with RAY and PDNA as major inputs. It also facilitated consultations with LGUs and other sectors as part of formulation process for CRRP. The CRRP integrated the short-, medium-, and long-term programs. It provided details of the implementation modalities and established guidance for the implementing national departments and agencies of government. The CRRP-identified Projects, Programs, and Activities (PPAs) required a total budget of Php 167 billion.National government agencies (NGAs) implement CRRP PPAs. The NEDA, pursuant to RA 10121 and Memo 79, coordinates and monitors implementation of these Program, Projects, and Activities (PPAs).
  2. Aside from the government’s DRM framework and the CRRP, the UN Agencies and international organizations applied the IASC framework in the planning and implementation of their respective recovery projects. Data shows that government, probably pressed for time, had been less participatory in their approach that the international agencies. Table below compares a sample of planning and implementation processes by two agencies.[7]

Table 2. Table comparing government and UNDP permanent housing programs

Project Components/Activities/ Processes National Housing Authority (NHA) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Planning and selection of beneficiaries Starts with determining the number of housing units to be constructed based on the housing need identified by the CRRP. Selection of beneficiaries consulted with LGUs and beneficiaries/community members. Beneficiaries organize themselves into Home Owners Association (HOA).
Design of housing unit NHA, approved by DPWH UNDP
Procurement Negotiated, RA 9184 UN procurement
Implementation Contractor-led: Private contractors build the houses. NHA supervises construction. Community-led: HOAs build the houses.UNDP supervises and provides technical assistance.
Construction Period 9 to 18 months 5 to 8 months
Award of housing units to beneficiaries LGU identifies beneficiaries Beneficiaries identified at start of planning period.
Project monitoring NHA, NEDA UNDP, NEDA
Sources: NHA reports and informant interviews (January 2016)

Community Disaster Preparedness and Resilience

  1. The implementation of capacity building programs (para 22) is expected to result in greater community disaster preparedness and resilience. The OCD and cluster lead agencies have been conducting trainings for LDRRMC members and other key stakeholders (see para 23). UN Agencies and international organizations have supported government in building capacity for community preparedness and resilience.Annex 3a provides a list (by no means complete) of international agencies with DRM projects in Region 8. A more specific list of DRM-related projects implemented by UNICEF is presented in Annex 3b.
  2. Annex 2b is a planning and monitoring tool for DRM developed by World Vision International (WVI). The need to design and apply the tool emerged from a series of meetings (facilitated by UNDP, WVI and UNRCO, among others) among Region 8-based agencies involved in DRM in 2015. It sought to address the lack of a coherent sharing of adequate information among LGUs, national government and non-government agencies that are working in DRM. WVI proposed that LGUs should apply the tool by regularly updating the required information, and likewise sharing it regularly with the national regional/national government, particularly with NEDA as the government’s central planning and monitoring agency, and the DND/OCD as chair of the N/RDRRMC.

Status of Post-Disaster Recovery Projects

Overall Accomplishments

  1. Figure 4 (please see details in Annex 5) shows the latest update on the status of Yolanda CRRP implementation. Government implementers of CRRP are led by the cluster heads, namely DSWD for Social Services, DTI for Livelihood, HUDCC/NHA for Resettlement, DPWH for Infrastructure, and DBM for Support Services. Completed, ongoing, and planned post-disaster projects supported by international organizations are presented in Table 3.
  2. Completed livelihood projects (some are still ongoing and/or being planned) included repair/replacement of fishing boats; provision of farm tools and implements (including tractors), fishing gears and paraphernalia; replacement of coconut trees with intercropping in some areas; provision of livelihood starter kits and related trainings; and provision of livelihood assistance grants (see sample of modalities and summary of recipient municipalities in Annex 5a).Livelihood projects implemented by internatinal organizations are presented in Annex 5b.

Figure 4. Infographics developed by NEDA summarizing updates on Yolanda CRRP implementation.

  1. For social services, completed projects (some are also still ongoing or being planned) included grants of emergency shelter assistance, textbooks and learning kits/ materials, deployment of health professionals to various Yolanda-affected areas, provision of RH commodities for women of reproductive age, and provision of micro-nutrient supplementation for children.A list of WASH, protection, education and related social services projects implemented by international organizations are presented in Annex 5c.
  2. For infrastructure, 59 kilometers (KMs) out of 105 KM target for national roads have been completed (56 percent); 1,118 linear meters (LMs) out of 1,852 LMs for national bridges have been completed (60 percent); 69 projects out of 88 projects for flood control structures have been completed (78 percent). Other completed projects included DPWH buildings, access roads, other structures/ facilities. International organizations have also contributed infrastructure facilities (Annex 5d).
  3. For resettlement, NHA reported thatit has already completed a total of 17,641 permanent housing units out of a total target of 92,554 (19 percent) in 11 provinces. As of December 2015, 928 families in Tanauan and Tacloban City, both in Leyte, have already moved in to their new NHA-constructed housing units. The total housing need of 205,123 units requires a total budget of Php61.2B; the current available fund is Php27B, which is enough to support construction of the target (92,554). The NHA estimates that its target will be fully achieved by December 2016. Annex 5e shows the locations of NHA and INGO resettlement projects (permanent and transitional shelters) in Region 8. The information shows where complementation among providers can be explored.
  4. For projects supported by international organizations, Table 3 below summarizes the relevant information in terms of Who, Where and What. From this list it can be considered that most of the projects are related to livelihood, social services, DRR, and resettlement, among the major cluster or sector categories. Livelihood projects included support for farmers, IDPs, and other typhoon victims in terms of financial grants, skills training, market development, and other capacity building inputs. Social services included education, nutrition, social protection, WASH and health care support. Shelter/resettlement projects included repair of damaged houses, provision of housing materials, construction of transitional and permanent shelter.[8]

Table 3. Completed, ongoing, and planned post-disaster projects supported by international organizations in Region 8

INGO/Agency Location (Province, Municipality) Sector/Cluster
ACF Leyte (La Paz, Ormoc City, Palo, Pastrana, Santa Fe, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa); W Samar (Basey, Marabut); E Samar (General MacArthur, San Julian) FSL, WASH, Livelihood, Nutrition
ACTED E Samar (Balangiga, Giporlos, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Macarthur, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo) Livelihood, WASH
Action Aid E Samar (Guiuan, Mercedes, Salcedo); Leyte (Albuera, Dulag, Merida, Ormoc City, Palo, Pastrana, Santa Fe); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) DRR, Women, Livelihood
ADRA Leyte (Alangalang, Carigara, Dagami, Leyte); E Samar(Giporlos) Shelter/Resettlement, WASH, Education, Livelihood
Arche Nova Alangalang, Dulag, Jaro, Julita, La Paz, Macarthur, Mayorga, Palo, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa WASH
CARE Leyte (Albuera, Barugo, Carigara, Dagami, Isabel, Jaro, Kananga, La Paz, Merida, Ormoc City, Pastrana, Santa Fe, Tabontabon, Tolosa, Tunga); W Samar (Basey, Catbalogan City, Santa Rita) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
CDRC-LCDE-DKH E Samar (General MacArthur, Quinapondan); Leyte (Albuera, Carigara, Jaro, Ormoc City, San Isidro); W Samar (Calbiga, Pinabacdao, San Sebastian) Livelihood, Psycho-Social, Shelter/Resettlement
CFSI E Samar (Guiuan, Mercedes, Salcedo); Leyte (Tacloban City); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Child Protection, Livelihood, DRR, Skills Training
Childfund Leyte (Alangalang, Albuera, Capoocan, Dagami, Dulag, Kananga, Ormoc City, Palo, Pastrana, San Miguel, Tacloban City, Tanauan) Livelihood, Education, Protection/Human Rights
Christian Aid Biliran (Almeria, Biliran, Cabucgayan, Caibiran); E Samar (Balangiga, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo) Leyte (Abuyog, Alangalang, Albuera, City of Baybay, Dulag, Isabel, Jaro, Javier [Bugho], Kananga, Leyte, Macarthur, Mayorga, Ormoc City, Tacloban City, Tolosa); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Food and Non-Food, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement

 

CRS E Samar (Balangkayan, General MacArthur, Giporlos, Lawaan, Quinapondan, Salcedo); Leyte (Burauen, Palo, Tabontabon, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa) Shelter/Resettlement, WASH, Livelihood, DRR, Protection/Human Rights
DCSA-JP/Cordaid E Samar (Guiuan) DRR, Education, Health, Infrastructure, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
ECOWEB, Inc. E Samar (Guiuan, Mercedes, Salcedo); Leyte (Dulag) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
FAO Biliran (Cabucgayan); E Samar (Balangiga, General MacArthur, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo); Leyte (Abuyog, Alangalang, Albuera, Babatngon, Barugo, Burauen, City of Baybay, Dagami, Dulag, Jaro, Javier [Bugho], Kananga, La Paz, Leyte, Macarthur, Mayorga, Merida, Ormoc City, Palo, Palompon, San Isidro, Tabango, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa, Villaba); W Samar (Basey, Marabut, Santa Rita) Livelihood
FHP W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Church Strengthening, Community Capacity Building, DRR, Health, Livelihood, WASH, Shelter/Resettlement
FPE E Samar (Balangiga, Giporlos, Guiuan, Lawaan, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo) Environment
GIZ Leyte (Abuyog, Alangalang, Barugo, Burauen, Dagami, Dulag, Hilongos, Javier [Bugho], Julita, La Paz, Macarthur, Mayorga, Palo, Pastrana, Tabontabon, Tanauan, Tolosa); W Samar (Basey, Marabut); S Leyte (Bontoc, City of Maasin, Hinunangan, Hinundayan, Liloan, Macrohon, Malitbog, Padre Burgos, Pintuyan, Saint Bernard) ENRD
GNIP E Samar (Guiuan) Education, Health, Livelihood, Protection/Human Rights
GOAL E Samar (San Julian, Sulat); Leyte (Jaro, Tunga) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, Education
Handicap International Leyte (Alangalang, Dagami, Jaro, Julita, Mayorga, Palo, Pastrana, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Tacloban City); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Livelihood, Protection/Human Rights, Shelter/Resettlement, DRR
Help from Germany E Samar (Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani); Leyte (Alangalang, Isabel, Kananga, Ormoc City, San Miguel, Tacloban City, Tanauan) Livelihood, Education, WASH, DRR

 

HUMEDICA E Samar (Balangiga, Hernani, Dagami, Julita, Palo, Tacloban City Health, Education, Infrastructure, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
ICRC E Samar (Guiuan) W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Shelter/Resettlement
IMC E Samar (Balangiga); Leyte (Albuera, Burauen, Dagami, Dulag, Julita, La Paz, Macarthur, Mayorga, Ormoc City, Tacloban City, Tolosa) Health, WASH
INTERSOS Santa Fe, Tabontabon, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa Education
IOM E Samar (Balangiga, City of Borongan, Guiuan, Hernani, Taft); Leyte (Carigara); W Samar (Marabut) Shelter/Resettlement
IRW-Philippines Leyte (Kananga, Villaba) DRR, Infrastructure, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
IsraAID Leyte (Ormoc City) Education, Livelihood
Lutheran World Relief Leyte (Burauen, Jaro, Kananga, Ormoc City) Livelihood, WASH, Shelter/Resettlement
MEDAIR Leyte (Dulag, Julita, La Paz) Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
MERCY Malaysia Leyte (Ormoc City) DRR, Education, Health
Muslim Aid Leyte (Tacloban City, Tanauan) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
Nazarene Disaster Response E Samar (Balangkayan); Leyte (Ormoc City, Tacloban City) Education
NCCP-ACT Alliance Leyte (Albuera, Tacloban City); W Samar (Basey, Marabut, Santa Rita) Livelihood, WASH, DRR, Shelter/Resettlement
Oxfam E Samar (Balangiga, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Salcedo); Leyte (Tacloban City) Agriculture, WASH, Micro-Enterprise, Women
PCMN E Samar (Balangiga, Balangkayan, Giporlos, Hernani, Lawaan, Quinapondan); N Samar (Allen, Catarman City, Lavezares) Child Protection, Education, Protection/Human Rights, Shelter/Resettlement
Philippines Communitere Leyte (Tacloban City) Livelihood
PIN E Samar (Balangkayan, Guiuan, Llorente, Maydolong, Mercedes, Salcedo) Livelihood, Market Development
Plan E Samar (Balangiga, Balangkayan, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo); Leyte (Burauen, Dagami, Dulag, Julita, Kananga, La Paz, Macarthur, Mayorga, Palo, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa, Ormoc City); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) DRR, FSL, Gender, Infrastructure, WASH
PRC Leyte (Ormoc City) Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
Relief International Leyte (Alangalang, Barugo, Carigara, Jaro, Julita, La Paz, Pastrana, San Miguel, Tunga) WASH
Samaritan’s Purse Leyte (Abuyog, Dulag, Isabel, Kananga, Matag-ob, Mayorga, Merida, Ormoc City, Palo, Pastrana, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Tacloban City, Tanauan); W Samar (Basey) Nutrition, WASH, Health, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
Save the Children Leyte (Alangalang, Dulag, Jaro, Javier, Julita, La Paz, MacArthur, Mayorga, Palo, Santa Fe, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa) DRR, Education, Livelihood, Protection/Human Rights, WASH, Shelter/Resettlement
SIF E Samar (Hernani) Shelter/Resettlement
TdH E Samar (Balangkayan, Hernani, Llorente, San Julian); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
Triangle G H E Samar (Guiuan) Livelihood
UNDP Biliran (Biliran, Biliran, Cabucgayan, Caibiran, Naval); E Samar (Balangiga, Balangkayan, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo); Leyte (Dulag, Ormoc City, Palo, Tacloban City); W Samar (Basey) Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, DRR, Infrastructure, Social Services
UNICEF E Samar (Balangiga, Balangkayan, Borongan City, General Macarthur, Giporlos, Guiuan, Hernani, Lawaan, Llorente, Maydolong, Mercedes, Quinapondan, Salcedo, San Julian); Leyte (Abuyog, Alangalang, Albuera, Barugo, Burauen, Capoocan, Carigara, Dagami, Dulag, Isabel, Jaro, Javier, Julita, Kananga, La Paz, MacArthur, Mayorga, Ormoc City, Palo, Palompon, Pastrana, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Tabontabon, Tacloban City, Tanauan, Tolosa, Tunga, Villaba); W Samar (Basey, Marabut) Child Protection, Health, Nutrition, WASH, Education, DRR

 

US Peace Corps E Samar (Salcedo) DRR, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement
WVI Leyte (Alangalang, Dagami, Dulag, Matag-ob, Merida, Ormoc City, Tacloban City, Villaba) Advocacy, CBP, DRR, Education, Health, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement, WASH
ZOA Philippines E Samar (Balangkayan, General MacArthur, Giporlos, Hernani, Quinapondan, San Julian) Education, Environment, Livelihood, Shelter/Resettlement

Notes: (1) The list of Agencies/INGOs is not complete; (2) Some agencies, like UNICEF, supported the activities of other INGOs.

Source: UNRCO Tacloban

Livelihood Sector

  1. Yolanda adversely affected the livelihood of 1.3 million individuals in Region 8 (please see Table 4, below).
Table 4. Number of Affected Population and Number of Beneficiaries
Sectors Affected (Baseline) Relief/Emergency Beneficiaries Recovery/Sustainable Livelihood Beneficiaries
Agriculture 1,335,231
Farmers 125,885
Fisherfolks 49,090
Coco Farmers 1,160,336
MSMEs 13,312
Micro 12,502
Small 760
Medium 31
Large 19
Accommodation Enterprises
Rooms 3,313
Total 1,348,543
Government 185,033 667,885
INGOs 288,331 268,853
Total 473,364 936,738
Source: DTI 8
  1. Combined inputs/projects from government and non-government agencies resulted in reaching a total number of 1.3 million beneficiaries during the emergency and early recovery/recovery periods.Currently in need of urgent focus is livelihood for more than 15,000 families who will be relocated offsite, and most of them are in Tacloban City.
  2. Table 5 below shows a summary of major livelihood projects implemented, or being implemented, by government in Yolanda-affected areas in Region 8. Also a more detailed summary of one of the projects (Livelihood Assistance Grant by DSWD) is shown as an example in Annex 5a. It is important to note that many of these government projects are also supported by international organizations.

Table 5. Government livelihood projects for Yolanda-affected areas in Region 8

Agency Livelihood Projects/Activities
DTI Shared Service Facility (SSF); Livelihood Seeding Program (LSP); Negosyo Center; Enterprise Rehabilitation Financing (ERF) of the Small Business Corporation (SB Corp); Coconut Industry Recovery and Rehabilitation for Eastern Visayas
PCA Coconut Timber Disposal; Coconut Replanting; Coconut Land Fertilization; Inter-cropping
BFAR Mariculture; Repair of Fishing Boats and Provision of Marine Engines; Provision of Fishing Gears and Paraphernalia
DOLE Emergency Employment; Integrated Livelihood Program
DA Cash for Work; Provision of Planting Materials; Provision of Other Farm Inputs; Insurance Premium for Crops, Livestock and Poultry
TESDA Livelihood Skills Training (includes construction-related trainings)
DSWD Cash for Building Livelihood Asset (CBLA); Livelihood Assistance Grant (LAG)
DOST Community Empowerment thru Science and Technology

Source: Annex 5

Other Recovery Sectors       

Social Services

  1. Social services projects included Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA), support for resettlement, and various forms of medical assistance. ESA grants have been given to 987,545 families out of 1,028,329 target families with damaged houses. Support for resettlement included provision of camp management services, provision of temporary water supply in transitional and permanent sites, psycho-social support services, etc. Medical support for Yolanda victims included deployment of medical professionals such as doctors, nurses and midwives. RH commodities and micro-nutrient supplementation have been given to women of reproductive age and to children, respectively.
  2. The ESA has drawn complaints from beneficiaries. Some of the complainants thought that the DSWD has not communicated well its guidelines on the ESA. For example, there was confusion on how government interpreted “no build zones” and “high risk areas” (Angela Sherwood 2015). These impacted on eligibility of beneficiaries living within these and neighboring areas. The DSWD also contended that some LGUs, who were responsible for the distribution of the grant funds, have not consistently followed the prescribed guidelines.

Resettlement

  1. The early recovery/recovery period (around August 2014) started with a humanitarian caseload of 3,947 families living in tent cities, evacuation centers and bunkhouses. By January 2015, tent cities and evacuation centers were closed.
  2. The number of families living the bunkhouses decreased from 3,539 in January 2015 to 2,665 in June 2015, and further down to 1,456 by November 2015. On the other hand, the number of families living in temporary housing increased from 295 in January 2015 to 1,720 by June 2015; by November 2015, the number dropped again to 682. Majority of this number is located in Tacloban City, which constructed close to 2,000 temporary housing units to help address shortage in delivery of permanent housing in the area.

Figure 5. Number of Families Living in Transitional Shelters (Bunkhouses and Temporary Housing) in Region 8, as of 18 November 2015

Figure 6. Number of Families Living in Permanent Housing in Region 8, as of November 2015

  1. Table 7, below, presents the summary of the implementation status of permanent housing program in Region 8. As of November 5, 2015, 9,620 units are either completed (ready for occupancy) or are substantially completed (75-99 percent completed). Government figures indicated that at least 56,140 families in Region 8 were displaced by Yolanda from their settlements in high risk areas and were in need of permanent housing solutions. However, only 39,918 housing units are presently targeted for actual construction, leaving a housing gap of 16,222 housing units.[9] Moreover, two years after approval of the CRRP, implementing agencies (principally National Housing Authority, or NHA) continue to encounter many issues. In Tacloban City, lack of water supply and other basic facilities compounds the issues related to delays in completion of permanent housing units. The deficiencies make the transfer of beneficiaries from temporary shelters to permanent resettlement sites more difficult than what was initially expected.

Table 6. Number of Families Living in Transitional Shelters and Permanent Housing in Region 8

Transitional Shelter
As of April 2015 As of June 2015 As of Nov 2015 %
Temporary Housing
Eastern Samar 0 133 133 19.50
Leyte 0 52 52 7.62
Samar 0 0.00
Tacloban City 1,697 1,535 497 72.87
1,697 1,720 682 100.00
Bunkhouses
Eastern Samar 358 66 80 5.49
Leyte 1,147 1,106 256 17.58
Samar 475 475 230 15.80
Tacloban City 1,018 1,018 890 61.13
2,998 2,665 1,456 100.00
Permanent Housing
Eastern Samar 0 0 0 0.00
Leyte 0 52 1,170 63.28
Samar 0 0 0 0.00
Tacloban City 0 17 679 36.72
0 69 1,849 100.00
Note: Of 1,849 families that live in permanent housing, 1,265 of them benefitted from housing units constructed by INGOs (Tzu Chi, GMA Kapuso, and Habitat for Humanity).

Sources: YPMO NEDA, Various LGUs, NHA

  1. Except for 148 families in Barangay Utap (managed by USAID/CRS), all temporary housing sites are being managed by the City Government of Tacloban. Private organizations and aid agencies, such as IOM, Operation Compassion, Operation Blessing, GAIN, PDRF, etc. helped the government in the construction of temporary housing units. Some private owners of the sites have also made available the temporary use of their properties.
  2. According to the City Housing and Development Office (CHDO) of Tacloban City, people living in temporary housing are first in the line of families who will transfer to permanent housing. Another set of families from danger zones and bunkhouses will take their place. Within the next months, the City Government expects completion of a total of 1,101 additional temporary housing units.

Table 7. Implementation Status of Government Permanent Housing Program in Region 8 as of 5 November 2015

Province/City/ Municipality Housing Need (No. of Families in High-Risk Zones) Number of Housing Units and Status of NHA Permanent Housing Program Unmet P Housing Need (Target vs Starts & New Proposals)
Target Starts Accomplishment New Proposals/ For Bidding
Ongoing Completed/ Substantially Completed/RFO Total
Biliran 8,905 8,905 522 522 0 522 2,245 6,138
Eastern Samar 7,573 7,573 1,605 842 419 1,261 3,940 2,028
Leyte 16,199 16,199 7,624 5,019 2,075 7,094 4,252 4,323
Samar 8,900 8,900 2,500 2399 101 2,500 2,667 3,733
Southern Leyte 130 130 0 0 0 0 130 0
Tacloban City 14,433 14,433 14,433 6,719 7,025 13,744 0 0
TOTAL 56,140 56,140 26,684 15,501 9,620 25,121 13,234 16,222
Source: NHA

 

  1. Due to relatively lower density, people living in temporary shelters are supposed to be in better living condition than those in bunkhouses. This is hardly the case, however, because temporary housing sites do not have adequate provision for basic utilities, such as electricity and water. On the other hand, while people living in bunkhouses have access to basic services (light, water, mobility, etc), interviews with residents showed that hygiene risks are high in their areas. In Sagkahan, Tacloban City, for example, latrines are clogged after three days of use. The maintenance contractor (supported by Catholic Relief Services, or CRS) visits the area once a month only.

DRR and other Cross-cutting Themes

  1. The UN Agencies are helping coordinate government and non-government activities not only in livelihood but also in Disaster Risk Reduction Management. Working groups have been established for facilitating sustained sharing of information among actors (para 74). Also, in the UNRCO-facilitated partners’ meetings (para 73), UN Agencies and international organizations, along with government agencies, share information and discuss isses on various topics, such as WASH, Livelihood, DRR, Gender, Child Protection, Environment, Community Empowerment , etc.

Coordination and Monitoring

  1. The tasks of coordinating and output monitoring recovery activities have been transferred from OPARR to NEDA. A Project Management/Monitoring Office (PMO) has been put up at the Regional Office of the NEDA to carry out these functions. Resource constraints (staff is down to 7 from 23 at OPARR, for example) as well as the process of settling in are likely to hinder PMO’s quick delivery of results that are expected from it. Sustained and effective outside support to the PMO would be required.
  2. Recovery Partners Meeting. This monthly meeting provides venue for information sharing among agencies involved in recovery activities. From March 2015 to August 2015, this meeting was convened by UNRCO/UNICEF Tacloban. Since September 2015 until November 2015, this meeting has been chaired by NEDA Regional Office 8, with UNICEF co-chairing it.[10] NEDA will continue to chair it, but UNDP Tacloban shall now co-chair it. There is need for more feed backing and putting up more media for information dissemination and sharing is widely recognized.(UNRCO 2015)
  3. Technical Working Groups. International development partners, with the UNDP and World Vision as lead convenors, have initiated and maintained a monthly Technical Working Group (TWG) meeting on DP/DRR. UNDP in Tacloban shall continue to convene this meeting. It also needs to designate, in coordination with the Office of the Civil Defense in Region 8, its DRR unit to take the place of the Liaison Team to continue providing Secretariat support so that this meeting will continue to be convened in the future.[11]The international development partners, following OCHA’s lead during the Response phase, also maintained a monthly coordination on community engagement. This has been found to help grounding of recovery projects and raising accountability issues with affected people and should be further supported.

Tacloban North and Other Ongoing Discussions

  1. Due to a compelling mix of factors (extent and concentration of damage, toll on human lives, partisanship being displayed by local versus national political leaders, magnitude of IDP and resettlement issues, etc.), Tacloban City had become the center of attention for Yolanda stakeholders. It grabbed media exposure. Most international organizations maintained offices and put up projects within the city. The City Government of Tacloban itself has initiated strong advocacies for its DRM and development agenda. It formulated a master plan—both physical and economic—for a township project it called Tacloban North, consisting of its northern barangays that would host the relocation of IDPs. More than 14,000 families (more or less 100,000 individuals) have been planned for relocation to Tacloban North. Aside from the actual identification of qualified beneficiaries, the City Government would still need to reconfigure its delivery systems for the education, day care, health, social protection, livelihood, peace and order needs, among many other basic services, for its constituents. If the LGU succeeds in running its township project, the area would soon be expected to attract migration, stimulating further economic activity and progress. At the same time, the area would be expected to demand an increasing amount of services from government.
  2. One of the biggest issues hounding Yolanda recovery is lack of basic facilities (water and electricity) in Tacloban North. The supposed beneficiaries of housing projects complained not only of not being adequately consulted, but also of being at the receiving end of dire consequences resulting from deprivation—among them, health, security, and social protection problems. In some cases, to quote then NEDA Director General Arsenio Balisacan, “IDP families spend more for water than those living in affluent Makati subdivisions for the same amount of service/utility.”
  3. In the last partners meeting (6 October 2015), the Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) reported that it would take 18 months to construct a water supply system that can provide a lasting solution to the water problem in the Tacloban relocation sites. Taking into account another 6 months for procurement activities, one can assume that completion and start of operation of the water system may take 24 months, or two years, to complete. LWUA expects that funding for the water system project would be released soon and the procurement process to start by January 2016.
  4. As an offshoot of that meeting, Oxfam, in collaboration with the City Government of Tacloban and NEDA, organized on 5 November 2015 a Water Conference that sought among other things to identify and drum up support for provision of temporary solutions in the relocation sites while the permanent solution is not yet available. At least two private entities have presented ways by which they can help fill the gap. But to make their service more affordable, some form of subsidy from government or partners is assumed. Government agencies, notably the DSWD, DPWH, and the NHA, also came forward with their respective proposals.

Challenges, Lessons Learned and Opportunities

  1. A wide range of activities have been undertaken since November 2013. However, many challenges remain. The following section frames the extent to which the need for support for recovery persists in Haiyan-affected communities; it discusses the lessons learned from experiences in implementation of recovery projects; finally, it explores the ways by which ADB can effectively support DRM not only in Region 8 and throughout the Philippines.

Implementation Issues and Challenges

General Observations

  1. For CRRP, bureaucratic red tape remains a major cause of delays in implementation of resettlement projects despite Administrative Order No. 44, which fixed timelines for government agencies to act on specific tasks, such as issuance of land titles and development permits. It is also a major issue in other CRRP clusters.
  2. Across all government clusters/sectors, delays in release of funds remain a problem. The CRRP requires a total budget of Php 170 Billion. Of this amount, only Php 90 Billion (53 percent) have been released so far. Government implementing agencies have also expressed being hindered by stringent and uneven application of procurement and auditing regulations.
  3. Affected communities complain of lack of participation in planning and implementation of government projects, social protection issues, domestic violence in transitional shelters, and other IDP issues about non-compliance with minimum standards. A Brookings study finds that “only slightly more than half of the population in the surveyed area believe that government recovery and reconstruction plans reflect their needs and preferences.” (Angela Sherwood 2015)

Sector-Specific Observations

  1. For the government transition shelters/sites, non-compliance with minimum standards (eg Sphere) brought up as early as August 2014 continues to be at least an object of debate among implementors and evaluators. Deficiencies include, as discussed in paras. 73-75 above, lack of facilities (water, electricity, etc.). Although being these are being addressed, they continue to be a problem in many permanent housing sites.
  2. Causes of delays in project implementation varied, viz:
  • For the resettlement program, the NHA and its contrractors have found it difficult to find land suitable for resettlement. Among the requirements were: land should be titled; land should be in safe areas; clearances must have been secured from MGB and PHIVOLCS. Also, for the most part the whole process of securing permits and licenses from government agencies (eg, DAR conversion and NIA clearance if land was used for agriculture; development permit from LGU; ECC from DENR; tax exemption from BIR) remained unwieldy, despite AO 44.
  • Delays in identifying and validating beneficiaries for government housing and livelihood projects resulted largely from lack of coordination in profiling and maintaining of database among government agencies and other service providers. Profiling became harder as IDPs and other potential beneficiaries became mobile. In other instances, people simply got tired in responding to too many interviews conducted by all sorts of organizations.
  • For infrastructure-related projects, assessment of infrastructure needs, validation, and preparation of engineering requirements took a longer time than what was initially expected. More delays resulted from failure of bidding due to ineligibility of bidders. In some cases there were no bidders at all.
  • Limited technical capacity of LGUs in the preparation of Plans and Program of Works and in the implementation of projects were also hindering factors.
  1. For livelihood, common issues included availability of raw materials, slow provision of government support, and lack of access to credit and insurance services. Also, integration among producers of raw materials and producers, as well as market linkages needed to be established (Annex 6). The livelihood cluster led by DTI, and supported by the UNDP and GIZ, among others, has collaborated with the Leyte Chamber of Commerce in exploring ways by which farmers groups could enhance their competitiveness and link them to a broader market. This initiative still needs to be supported and sustained, however.
  2. For social services, the government handling of the ESA needs improvement. Distribution of the grant was not only delayed; it was prone to misinformation and therefore confusion among beneficiaries. Unsurprisingly, complainants beseiged the DSWD and LGUs.

Lessons Learned

Coordinating Recovery Projects

  1. LGUs, national government agencies and international organizations recognize the importance of support provided by the UN and other agencies in coordinating Yolanda recovery activities in Region 8 (UNRCO 2015). This function has now been assumed by NEDA through its YPMO. Stakeholders would do well to help NEDA perform its task well.
  2. The government clusters under OPARR did not operate fully according to plan. The Social Services cluster, for example, did not hold regular meetings despite its implementation issues and the obvious need for improved coordination among its members. The NEDA, as Vice Chair of RDRRMC’s Rehabilitation and Recovery Committee, should know the OPARR lessons on coordination and institute changes in procedures.

Levelling Off of Standards

  1. In some instances, the “surge” of international staff members of international organizations gave rise to tensions in project sites and work areas with their local counterparts. Conflicts arose over interpretations of DRM standards. For example, while local staff are familiar with Philippine laws and regulations on DRM, international staff members invoked the IASC framework and Sphere standards. An observation was raised that international workers needed to be grounded on how the Philippine government operates during disaster response and recovery (Angela Sherwood 2015).
  2. For INGOs working on humanitarian/emergency response, the following comments from an INGO worker were insightful (A. a. Jacobs 2013):
  • Focus on the priorities. Don’t try to do everything at once. Accept initial levels of choas and confusion. Immediate priorities probably include: (a) understand how things are working in the Philippines, and who is doing what; (b) develop initial plans based on local needs not what donors have to give; (c) think ahead when organising initial work, so it will be relevant in the coming weeks. Prepare to adapt priorities as circumstances change in the coming weeks.
  • Understand the role of the army and the government. The army will probably play a leading role in the initial response, with international assistance. They may run the airport, clear major routes, oversee logistics and provide security (in due course). NGOs should understand how the army is organised and what they see as their role – as well as how government is organised. NGOs may be able to influence what they are doing and define complementary roles. For instance, NGOs may be better at running distributions and engaging with marginalised people.
  • Work with local municipality/city leaders and other community leaders. They know who lives (or lived) where and how things work. Though they probably do not have strong capacity to deliver relief. NGOs should listen to city, municipality and barangay leaders when they are (a) designing relief activities and identifying who to give relief to, and (b) reviewing how to improve their activities.
  • Keep the public (in affected communities) informed about: (a) when and where NGOs are going to provide assistance; (b) key public health messages, (c) how people can give and get information about missing people / mortalities, and (d) other priorities that emerge for affected people (e.g. transport options, role of authorities). NGOs can put up notice boards, distribute leaflets, broadcast messages by radio and use local media & networks.
  • Work collaboratively, not independently. NGOs should recognise their role as one part of a locally-led, wider effort. All NGOs should consider other actors’ plans when they design their own activities and share information about their activities. They should publish their needs assessments and plans on-line (using co-ordination websites like Humanitarian Response or GDACS). They should support local partners and organisations. All NGOs should be prepared to adapt what they’re doing in the light of what other actors are doing. And donors should support this flexibility, when necessary.
  • Go the extra mile to find the most vulnerable and worst affected people (e.g. adolescent girls). They are likely to have specific needs and to be easily ignored or side-lined by mainstream relief efforts. NGOs can play an important role in making sure they benefit fully from official relief. Though this will likely need specific resourcing.
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of mental well being. People need help in dealing with immediate shock, trauma and grief – as well as help in coming to terms with what’s happened to their families and their plans for the future. NGOs can help reduce stress, for instance by encouraging practical mutual support within communities (e.g. around accessing aid), avoiding huge life changing decisions and treating people with kind dignity.
  • Support local markets and move to cash transfers as soon as possible. Local markets are probably working better than assumed. They will improve rapidly as opportunities arise and create jobs, dignity and normality. NGOs should support local markets as much as possible. For instance, they should buy goods locally wherever possible and give people money (through cash transfers) so they can choose what to buy for themselves.
  • Build up two-way communication with the local public. In the coming weeks, NGOs should provide more information to the public about how to get in touch with them. Every time an NGO logo or noticeboard is put up, it should include contact details of named members of staff. NGOs should be transparent about their plans and budgets. They should make use of local media outlets. They should ensure that local people are involved in designing projects. And they should systematically ask local people for comments and feedback about the relief they provide – and respond to their comments. Donors should support this flexibility.
  • Building permanent houses is difficult. Don’t rush into it! Thoughtful construction takes time, involving many social and legal issues as well as technical ones. NGOs shouldn’t expect that people can move from temporary shelter (like tents) to permanent houses in a year. They may be stuck in tents for a long time. Interim housing may be an important option. NGOs should consider providing people with reasonable quality housing materials – or money to buy their own.

Role of LGUs and Capacity Building for LDRRMCs

  1. In keeping with Philippine DRM laws and policies, LGUs need to take the lead in disaster response and recovery efforts. However, national government would need to continually enhance capacity of LGUs in discharging its DRM functions, specifically the LDRRMC/Os. Needed support would include funding and technical assistance on planning, project management, monitoring, organizational strengthening, provision of related equipment and facilities, information technology and database management, among other things. In short, this requires full and effective implementation of the RDRRM Plan (Annex 2 and Annex 2a).
  2. An LGU-led activity would require that all response and recovery inputs (including those coming from international agencies) intended for a specific area would be coordinated and monitored by the LGU. For activities focused on a municipality/city, the municipal/city LGU should be the lead agency. For activities focused on a province, the provincial LGU should be the lead agency. However, for activities focused on more than one province, the national government, through its regional offices, should be the lead agency. Another exception could present itself if the damage brought about by a disaster is so devastating, as in the case of Yolanda, that LGU staffmembers are themselves victims and unable to perform their functions. For a limited time, this event would require the national government to bring in people and other resources from other areas to the disaster-hit area. The exact protocol for such an action should be developed by the national government, through the OCD, with consensus from the various LGU leagues (eg. League of Provinces, Cities, Municipalities, etc.).
  3. While Philippine DRM laws are hamonized with DRM-related international agreements, LGU DRM workers frame DRM standards with the terms and context of Philippine laws. Effort and energy could be dissipated by international agencies trying to pound the LGUs with ideas drawn directly from international standards (eg. IASC and Sphere).

Community Participation

  1. In documenting government projects, Liaison Teams’ have found that adequate and informed community participation in every stage of project implementation (from planning, construction or implementation, operation and maintenance to monitoring) was an issue in many of those projects. This observation was also highlighted by the Brookings study (Angela Sherwood 2015).
  2. Technologies that apply community processes can be used to enhance DRM activities related to planning and assessment (eg. PDNA), profiling (see paras 72 and 81), and project implementation and monitoring (see Table 2). These technologies include community-driven development (eg KALAHI CIDSS of DSWD), Bottom Up Budgeting of DBM, and Community Mortgage Program (CMP) of the Social Housing Finance Corporation.

Systems Development

  1. Related to community participation, there is need to develop systems that would activate in a seamless manner recovery and development activities while emergency response activities are being undertaken. This means tools used for recovery, such as PDNA, should be able to benefit from community participation. The objective of the process is to ensure that projects truly respond to community needs. The process must raise the level of community awareness, encourage stakeholdership/beneficiary ownership and buy-in, increase efficiency in project implementation, add stock to social capital, and further promote people empowerment.
  2. The systems integrating response and recovery activities must necessarily necessarily link the work of humanitarian and development actors. For this purpose, the agenda (eg UNDAF) of humanitarian and development agencies must be reviewed and synchronized. As the UN study on efforts that support durable solutions for IDPs suggests, local and international agencies involved in development activities should engage earlier during the humanitarian phase to ensure the continuity and coherence of short-term and longer-term interventions. These interventions should be integrated into broader urban planning and growth strategies. Moreover, the government needs to recognize displacement as a development issue for both IDPs and host communities. Humanitarian’s traditional focus on target groups such as IDPs needs to be complemented by broader development plans (Gupta 2015).

Opportunities for ADB Support in DRM

Support for DRRM Planning and Implementation

  1. The “new normal” presented by Yolanda (eg minimum design standard for housing projects required by DPWH) requires review and adjustments in indicators of success for government DRRM plans. The government, from the national to the barangay level, needs to update its DRRM plans. The process needs to be enriched with community participation inputs. Equally important is increasing the capacity of communities and LGUs to implement their DRRM plans. This in turn requires capacity building support for local DRRMCs.
  2. Despite the comprehensive menu of projects to address DRRM gaps in Region 8, there remains serious constraints on effective DRRM at the local level. In most municipal LGUs in the region, local DRRM offices are not established or functions, local DRRM plans are either deficient or nonexistent, mitigation and prevention structures are lacking in high risk areas, and LGU response capacities are generally low.(UNRCO 2015)

Collaboration with UN Agencies and International Development Partners

  1. The United Nations Development Assistance Framework for the Philippines 2012-2018 (UNDAF) commits the UN Agencies to support achieving the Philippine Development Plan objectives. Support for DRRM is outlined under Outcome 4 of UNDAF. Figure 6 identifies the UN Agencies involved in DRRM.
  2. UN Commitments under UNDAF (Annex 4). The UN in the Philippines commits financial support for DRRM-related projects until 2018. Areas of interest include the following:
  3. Policies, plans and mechanisms: DRRM integration into national policies, plans and programmes based on hazard risk, vulnerability and capacity assessments; DRRM integration into local policies, plans and programmes based on hazard risk, vulnerability and capacity assessments; Implementation of priority—DRRM mitigation and preparedness actions at national and local levels.
  4. Competency building: Technical training and skills development on DRRM including community-based DRRM; Institutionalisation of DRRM capacity-building programmes; and Strengthening of DRMM networks and partnerships.
  5. Knowledge management: Development of new or strengthening of existing facilities or institutions functioning as DRRM knowledge hubs; DRRM knowledge products development and dissemination; and Establishment of DRMM community of practice.
  6. The ADB, among others, is one of UN partner agencies under the UNDAF.

Figure 7. UN Agency-specific Presence and Interventions along the DRRM Continuum

Livelihood Projects

  1. The ADB knowledge sharing sessions (Annex 6), participants agreed that support is needed for the following livelihood-related activities:
  2. Developing sources of raw materials at community level, along with organizational development of farmers groups;
  3. Developing market linkages (trade fairs, institutional markets, etc.) and promote value adding (processing, provide value chain analysis) as means of increasing workers’ and farmers’ incomes;
  4. For government and development partners to continuously provide technical assistance on product and market development, as well as in areas of organizational development and skills enhancement;

Conclusion and Recommendations: Next Steps for DRM and Yolanda Recovery in the Philippines

DRM

  1. RA 10121 is under review and proposed amendments are pending in Congress. Whether the proposal for the creation of a superbody for DRR/CCA is adopted or not, the planning process for preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery projects should be enriched by community participation. Problems that arise during implementation have been compounded due to lack of community participation and support, as shown for example by the permanent housing projects in Tacloban City. The Brookings study also showed that many Yolanda survivors do not believe that government projects respond to their needs.
  2. Community participation should start at the RDANA and PDNA process. For this purpose, the membership and active participation by CSO and private sector representatives in the LDRRMCs must ensured. Existing government projects that apply community-based approaches can enhance community participation in DRM. These projects include KALAHI CIDSS and Bottom Up Budgeting (BUB). The pending bills in Congress should do well to integrate and institutionalize these approaches in DRM.
  3. In planning for and implementation of DRM projects, such as housing and livelihood, options should be discussed with IDPs and host communities, taking into account the following: (a) existing laws and standards on DRM, environment, water, housing and urban development, accounting and auditing, taxation; (b) the technical aspects of projects, such as compliance with standards on zoning, hazard and environmentally critical areas, building back better principles, etc.; and (c) financial requirements of projects with sensitivity to sources and availability of public and private funds, the government budget cycle, timeframe for procurement, etc.
  4. Related to para 94, above, humanitarian relief work should be integrated with follow-up interventions (eg, cash-based assistance is combined with livelihood programs that would incude skills training and provision of starter loans or grants) (Gupta 2015).

Post-Yolanda Recovery

  1. With reference to Tacloban North, there is need to review and strengthen the role of the LGU with respect to the links between government, para-government and private infrastructure and service providers (ie water, electricity, solid waste management), as well as on how the international humanitarian and development agencies can better support the process.
  2. The UN, and the international development community in general, needs to be updated on the progress of providing temporary solutions to the water problem in the Tacloban relocation sites and provide support where it can.
  3. As co-chair of the monthly Partner’s Meeting, the UNDP can provide the link between the UNRC and government on matters relating to Yolanda recovery activities in Region 8. On consolidating reports and providing monthly updates to the UNRC and UN Country Team on recovery activities throughout Yolanda-affected regions, the UNDP Team/Staff at NEDA Central Office is assumed to address this need. The UNRCO in Makati will need to have a link with YPMO for purposes of feedbacking and sharing of updates on implementation of government and non-government recovery projects, for information and consideration by the RC.
  4. The monthly TWG meeting on DP/DRR, Livelihood, also convened by UNDP, will need Secretariat support.
  5. The updating process for the monthly agency mapping is now undertaken by the YPMO. This will need to be sustained. The UN may respond to government requests for further assistance by NEDA on IM capacity building and strengthening. The UN needs to sustain the technical support it has made available to the YPMO.
  6. On improving accountability, the following steps (A. Jacobs 2015) are proposed:
  7. Invest in leadership at all levels. Without consistent leadership, accountability will be washed away by other priorities. OCHA’s AAP Co-ordinators have a crucial role to play, across the whole of any response. Within agencies, leaders need to be identified in head office and field offices with specific responsibility to ensure that accountability gets the attention it requires. And they need to be backed up by resources.
  8. Simplify the requirements (and the jargon). We need to simplify the requirements for transparency and community engagement, and build them into our core practice. This means cutting through the confusing jargon of: Accountability to Affected People, Communicating with Communities, Preventing Sexual Exploitation & Abuse etc. Can we settle on simple, intuitive terms instead? We need staff to focus on talking to local people in ways that work from their point of view, and include marginalized groups, rather than off the shelf tools. And we urgently need the international organizations that lead these different areas to work together on a simple, consistent approach.
  9. Use collective approaches where possible. The more that different agencies use the same terms and tools, the cheaper and easier for everyone. And the easier for communities and government to understand us and talk to us. The Core Humanitarian Standard provides a common foundation. It may not be perfect, but it’s pretty good and that’s good enough. We should use it. We should collaborate on collective tools like feedback mechanisms, communication campaigns and assessment tools where possible.
  10. Adapt project plans. Agencies need to be able to adapt their work in response to what local people tell them. Can we agree with donors (and internally) that we will review and re-plan the activities of all major projects three months after work starts (particularly in the first year of a major response); and then also at least annually? More flexibility would be better, but inevitably hard to organize on the ground.
  11. Report beneficiary satisfaction. Donors and senior managers should require field teams to systematically report beneficiaries’ satisfaction with their work. This could be done however makes sense in the context. It has the potential to generate real insights into the work carried out and reinforce a focus on listening and responding to local people.

Mainstreaming DP, DRR, CCA

  1. The performance indicators for National and Regional DRRM Plans, along with that of Outcome 4 of UNDAF, need to be amended in the light of new realities and norms presented by Yolanda. For the DRRM Plans, quantitative indicators can be supported by qualitative indicators.
  2. The Mainstreaming Template drafted by World Vision International (Annex 2b), can be enhanced and applied to enhance the N/RDDRM Plan, UNDAF (Outcome 4) and CPS (paras. 18, 27 and 31).
  3. The UN and ADB may initiate on elaboration of a project model that can map or guide the transformation of the YPMO into an institution for future recovery coordination mechanisms involving both government and non-government agencies. Considering the experiences shared among agencies involved in Yolanda Recovery, the proposal to put up a super structure (egg, cabinet-level department) in charge of CCA and DRR as a result of the ongoing sunset review of RA 10121 merits support. This new structure may assume the functions not only of OCD and its sub-committees but also those of other related agencies (eg, Climate Change Commission, HLURB, and some agencies under DOST). Also, burdened by its heavy welfare projects (Pantawid/4Ps, KALAHI, etc), the DSWD can unload most of its response-related tasks to this new agency. More importantly, this new agency should be able to manage all DRM and CCA related funds.
  4. Through its authority and available resources (stick and carrot, as it were), the super-structure should be able, among other things, to overcome issues experienced by OPARR (para 85). Perceptions among agencies that OPARR lacked authority and resources kept them from complying with coordination and reporting requirements.[12]

 

Annexes

Annex 1: Terms of Reference and Consultant Schedule

Contract:124020

Project:SC 106359 PHI: Disaster Risk Management

Expertise:National Disaster Risk Management Specialist– Staff Consultant

Source:National

Objective and Purpose of the Assignment

The objective of the assignment is to assist EMY and PhCO with a deeper understanding of theoutstanding challenges in disaster risk management (DRM) and post-disaster recovery in the TyphoonYolanda affected areas. The consultant will be required to study the various ongoing activities inlivelihood recovery, community disaster preparedness and resilience. In addition, with the currentcountry partnership strategy (CPS) for the Philippines,2011–2016, nearing completion, the work of thenational DRM specialist on the Typhoon Yolanda affected areas may be used as one of the inputs tothe preparation of the next CPS.

EMY/PhCO needs the services of a national disaster risk management specialist to assist EMY and thePhilippines Country Team. The services of the national consultant will be required for 30 person-daysintermittently, starting on December 2015, and to be completed by January 2016.

Scope of Work

The assessment will consist of a desk study and analysis of secondary information and data, as well asconsultation with key stakeholders. The assessment will provide EMY and PhCO with (i)comprehensive overview of climate change and DRM challenges and opportunities and (ii) futuredirections for possible ADB assistance in the Typhoon Yolanda affected areas; (iii) lessons learned from the Typhoon Yolanda recovery that can be used to inform the preparation of the next PhilippineCPS.

Detailed Tasks and/or Expected Output

The following are the national consultant’s detailed tasks:

  1. Review relevant secondary information and data;
  2. Conduct consultation with key stakeholders to collect additional data (if necessary), and validatestudy findings and recommendations; and
  3. Prepare assessment document, including necessary appendices.

Minimum Qualification Requirements

  • The national consultant should have at least 7 years of extensive experience in climate change,environment and disaster risk management in the Philippines.
  • Minimum General Experience: 7 Years
  • Minimum Specific Experience (relevant toassignment): 7 Years
  • Regional/Country Experience Required

Deliverables Estimated Submission Date Type

  • Inception Report 15-Dec-2015 Report
  • Draft Final Report 05-Jan-2016 Report
  • Final Report 30-Jan-2016 Final Report

Schedule and Places of Assignment (chronological and inclusive of travel)

Deliverables Estimated Submission Date Type    
Inception Report 15-Dec-2015 Report
Draft Final Report 05-Jan-2016 Report
Final Report 30-Jan-2016 Final Report
         
         
Schedule and Places of Assignment (chronological and inclusive of travel)  
City and Country Working Days Est. Start Date Est. End Date Other Details
Manila, Philippines 15 10/12/2015 31/12/2015  
Tacloban, Philippines 15 01/01/2016 31/01/2016  
         
TOTAL 30 Intermittent;
    Max. Working Days/Week: 5 for Home Office, 6
    for Field
         
NOTE: Actual schedule to be confirmed with User Unit.    

 

Annex 2: Regional DRRM Plan Summary

Regional DRRM Plan Summary

Thematic Area 1: Disaster Prevention and Mitigation

Overall responsible agency: Department of Science and Technology (DOST)

Outcome      Lead agency(ies)
1. DRRM   and   CCA   mainstreamed   and

integrated in national, sectoral, regional and local development policies, plans and budget

 

Office of Civil Defense (OCD)

2. DRRM  and  CCA-sensitive  environmental

management

     Department  of  Environment  and

Natural Resources (DENR)

3. Increased resiliency of infrastructure systems      Department  of  Public  Works  and

Highways (DPWH)

4. Enhanced and effective community-based

scientific DRRM and CCA assessment,

mapping, analysis and monitoring

 

OCD

5. Communities  access  to  effective  and

applicable  disaster  risk  financing  and insurance

Department of Finance (DOF)
6. End-to-end  monitoring  (monitoring  and

response), forecasting and early  warning

systems are established and/or improved

 

Department of Science and Technology

(DOST)

Thematic Area 2: Disaster Preparedness

Overall responsible agency: Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)

Outcome      Lead agency(ies)
7. Increased level of awareness and enhanced capacity of the community to the threats and impacts of all hazards  

Philippine Information Agency (PIA)

8. Communities are equipped with necessary skills and capability to cope with the impacts of disaster Department of Interior and Local Government (to coordinate) and OCD (to implement)
9. Increased DRRM and CCA capacity of Local DRRM Councils, Offices and Operation Centers at all levels DILG
10. Developed and implemented comprehensive national and local preparedness and response policies, plans, and systems DILG and OCD
11. Strengthened partnership and coordination  among all key players and stakeholders DILG

Thematic Area 3: Disaster Response

Overall responsible agency: Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)

Outcome      Lead agency(ies)
12. Well-established disaster response operations Department of Social Welfare and

Development   (DSWD)

13. Adequate and prompt assessment of needs and damages at all levels  Disaster  Risk  Reduction  and Management

Councils (DRRMCs), OCD and DSWD

14. Integrated and coordinated Search, Rescue and Retrieval (SRR) capacity Department of National Defense (DND),

DILG, Department of Health (DOH)

15. Safe and timely evacuation of affected communities Local Government Units (LGUs)
16. Temporary shelter needs adequately addressed DSWD
17. Basic social services provided to affected

population (whether inside or outside evacuation centers)

DOH
18. Psychosocial needs of directly and indirectly

affected population addressed

DOH
19. Coordinated, integrated system for early

recovery implemented

DSWD

Thematic Area 4: Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery

Overall responsible agency: National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)

Outcome      Lead agency(ies)
20. Damages, losses and needs assessed OCD
21. Economic activities restored, and if possible strengthened or expanded Agency to be determined based on the affected sectors
22. Houses rebuilt or repaired to be more resilient to hazard events; safer sites for  housing National Housing Authority (NHA)
23. Disaster and climate change-resilient infrastructure constructed/reconstructed DPWH
24. A psychologically sound, safe and secure citizenry that is protected from the effects of disasters is able to restore to normal functioning after each disaster DOH and DSWD

 

The RDRRMP is a road map on how DRRM shall contribute to gender-responsive and rights-based sustainable development. Highlights include:

  • The need for institutionalizing DRRM policies, structures, coordination mechanisms and programs with continuing budget appropriation on DRR from national down to local levels. Thus, several activities will strengthen the capacity of the personnel of national government and the local government units (LGUs) and partner stakeholders, build the disaster resilience of communities and institutionalize arrangements and measures for reducing disaster risks, including climate risks.
  • The importance of mainstreaming DRRM and CCA in the development processes such as policy formulation, socio-economic development planning, budgeting and governance, particularly in the area of environment, agriculture, water, energy, health, education, poverty reduction, land-use and urban planning and public infrastructure and housing, among others. This is achieved through activities such as development of common tools to analyze the various hazards and vulnerability factors which put communities and people in harm’s way.
  • Competency and science-based capacity building activities alongside the nurturing of continuous learning through knowledge development and management of good DRRM practices on the ground.
  • The inclusion of human-induced disasters that result in internally displaced persons, public anxiety, loss of lives, destruction of property and sometimes socio-political stability. Encompassing conflict resolution approaches, the plan seeks to mainstream DRRM into the peace process.

The RDRRMP is guided by good governance principles within the context of poverty alleviation and environmental protection. It is about partnerships towards effective delivery of services to the citizenry, i.e. working together through complementation of resources. Thus, harnessing and mobilizing the participation of civil society organizations (CSOs), the private sector and volunteers in the government’s DRRM programs and projects is part and parcel of the plan. Efforts were made to align the RDRRMP with national plans such as the Philippine Development Plan, National Climate Change Action Plan, and National Security Policy such that DRRM activities are integrated with budget allocation by relevant government line agencies. Specific DRRM-related activities are undertaken using timelines that will help national leaders and local chief executives to ensure completion within their terms.

Annex 2a: Regional DRRM Plan Priority Projects

To fast track the implementation of the RDRRMP, priority projects anddemonstration sites are identified. The purpose is to either replicate good DRRM practices or implement projects in areas which need them most. All priority projects are to be implemented within the immediate or short term period from 2011 to 2013. The priority projects of the RDRRMP are:

  1. Development of the following Plans:
  • Joint work plan for DRRM and CCA
  • Local DRRM plans
  1. Development of IEC and advocacy materials on RA 10121, DRRM and CCA
  2. Development of guidelines on
  • Communications and information protocol before, during and after disasters
  • Creation of DRRM teams
  • Criteria/standards for local flood early warning systems
  • Evacuation
  • Infrastructure redesign and/or modifications
  • Manual of operations of disaster operations centers
  1. Development of tools on
  • DRRM and CCA mainstreaming in the national and local-level planning
  • Damage and Needs Assessment (DANA) and Post-DANA
  • Psychosocial concerns
  1. Establishment of
  • Local flood early warning systems (through integrated and sustainable management river basins and water sheds
  • End-to-End Early Warning Systems in Provinces of Leyte, Southern Leyte, Biliran , Samar, Eastern Samar and Northern Samar.
  1. Establishment of local DRRM Councils and Offices and their operations centers, as prescribed by RA 10121
  2. Conduct of inventory of existing DRRM and CCA resources and services
  3. Development and implementation of DRRM and CCA activities using 5% of government agency’s allocation from the annual national budget or General Appropriations Act (GAA);
  4. Hazard and risk mapping in the most high-risk areas in the region.
  5. Institutional capability program on DRRM and CCA for decision makers, public sector employees, and key stakeholders
  6. Mainstreaming DRRM and CCA
  7. PDNA capacity building for regional line agencies, and local offices.
  8. Review the following:
  • Building Code and integrate DRRM and CCA
  • Executive Order No. 72 s. 1993, which provides for the preparation and implementation of the CLUPs of local government units
  • Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA No. 10121
  • Various environmental policies (i.e., EO No. 26, etc) to integrate DRRM and CCA

Cross-Cutting Concerns

The RDRRMP recognizes that certain concerns cut across the four thematic areas. These include health, human-induced disasters, gender mainstreaming, environmental protection, cultural sensitivity or indigenous practices, and the rights-based approach. Lastly, R.A. 10121 provides that the OCD shall utilize the RDRRMP as the instrument by which the government ensures consistency of DRRM measures with the physical framework, social and economic and environmental plans of communities, cities, municipalities and provinces.

Health

People’s vulnerability to disaster has become more complex with the onset of climate change. Single hazard events such as floods and heat waves can overlap, resulting in a broad range of impact scenarios. Minor disturbances in the environment surrounding the ecosystem can have far reaching consequences on the exposure of humans to health-related hazards like avian influenza (which is related to the changes in habits of migratory birds); malaria and dengue (which increases mosquito abundance in areas experiencing warmer and dumper temperatures, respectively). Likewise, rising sea-level and increasing flooding events disproportionately affect the poor through sanitation of their water sources. It is this important to look at these concerns in each of the thematic areas of the RDRRMP.

Human-Induced Disasters

In the region, people are vulnerable not only because of natural hazards but also due to disasters more commonly associated with armed conflict, terrorism and war. In the entire RDRRMP, consideration of the factors which contribute to these risks are important and should be looked into at all times, taking cognizance of the underlying causes of people’s vulnerabilities.

Gender Mainstreaming

Gender mainstreaming is about the recognition, acceptance, identification and addressing of the different roles, needs, capacities and vulnerabilities of men and women. The RDRRMP is committed to promoting gender-sensitive vulnerability and capacity-analysis in all disaster risk reduction and management activities. It encourages balancing the roles, responsibilities, needs, interests, capacities of and effect on both genders of contingency plans as well as implementation of community-based activities. Gender mainstreaming is about reducing the vulnerabilities of men and women to disasters and encourages a balance in the participation and decision making roles of men and women in DRRM.

Environmental Protection

Care for the environment is essential in order to minimize vulnerability and avoid increasing risk levels. Measures must be undertaken so that activities in all priority areas do not create stress on the region’s natural resources.

Cultural Sensitive/Indigenous Practices

The RDRRMP recognizes the importance of culturally-sensitive risk reduction measures at all levels. People’s vulnerability to disasters as well as their capacities to adapt to the changing realities are more often than not related to cultural and indigenous practices. By being sensitive to the indigenous practices and local knowledge, DRRM approaches will become more effective and more easily understood and embraced by the people.

Rights-based Approached

DRRM is our country’s priority because people have the right to live, safety, information, education, cultural beliefs and right to better lives as protected by the Constitution.

Implementation Strategies

Various strategies are identified below to implement the RDRRMP and achieve the desired key results under each of the four thematic areas.

Advocacy and Information, Education and Communication (IEC)

A strong national and local commitment is required to save lives and livelihoods threatened by natural and human-induced disasters. Achieving this will need increasing visibility and understanding of DRRM and CCA issues, mobilizing partnerships, encouraging actions and gathering public support for successful implementation of the different activities. The RDRRMP will use evidence-based advocacy to influence people, policies, structures and systems in order to build resilient communities in the region by raising awareness, working with the media and key stakeholders. The RDRRMP will develop advocacy, IEC and various communication strategies based on risk assessments and good DRRM practices.

Competency-Based Capability Building

Customized training programs should be developed and conducted to ensure that people are trained based on the needed skills in the different DRRM aspects. Different people have different needs and capacities and developing competency-based capability building programs ensures that knowledge, skills and attitudes are enhance and built upon further.

Contingency Planning

More commonly used before as only part of disaster preparedness activit6ies, the contingency plan is updated and used in all the different priority areas of DRRM. Lessons from past experiences and complementary actions between and across areas should be taken into consideration in developing contingency plans at all levels.

Education on DRRM and CCA for all

Mainstreaming DRRM into formal education should be undertaken through the integration of DRRM and CCA concepts in the curriculum for basic education, the National Service Training Program (NSTP) at the tertiary level, and bachelor’s degree programs. This also includes the conduct of DRRM and CCA training of all public sector employees as mandated by law and the training of teachers and development of teaching materials at the primary and secondary levels.

Institutionalization of DRRMCs and LDRRMOs

The creation of permanent local DRRM offices and functioning councils at the local level is one of the ways to ensure that all DRRM-related activities, plans and programs will be implemented and sustained, especially at the local level. Having a point of convergence is important to ensure that risk reduction measures complement one another and are institutionalized with the end in view of reducing people and institutional vulnerabilities

to disasters. This will likewise promote the paradigm shift towards mainstreaming DRRM in local planning by investing risk-reduction measures from the reactive mode exemplified by activities limited to disaster response operations.

Mainstreaming of DRR in all plans

In all four (4) Priority Areas under the RDRRMP, ensuring the mainstreaming of DRRM and CCA in the various programs, plans, projects of either regional or local government units, including the private sector groups and other members of the community is a must. This primarily means that disaster risk analysis and impacts are integrated and taken into consideration in the development of policies and plans by the different agencies, organizations and sectors.

Research, Technology Development and Knowledge Management

With the changes in the climate and technological advances, regularly conducting research and technology development will contribute to more innovative and adaptive mechanism and approaches towards DRRM and CCA. Along side new information, knowledge management through database development, documentation, recognition and replication of good practices will help achieve the objectives and targets of the RDRRMP through more efficient use of resources, learning and experiences.

Networking and Partnership Building Between and Among stakeholders, media and tiers of government

Building resilient communities cannot and should not be done by a single agency or organization. Its success is highly dependent on the close collaboration and cooperation of the different stakeholders. Building effective and mutually reinforcing partnership and evolving networks ensure the multi-stakeholders and mulri-sectoral participation of the different players in DRRM.

Pre-disaster Recovery Planning for Faster Post-Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery

Whenever a disaster occurs, there is always great pressure to quickly reconstruct damaged infrastructures and critical other facilities. Pre-disaster recovery planning will help in a more effective response, hasten the recovery from the impacts of a disaster and ensure the achievement of rehabilitation and recovery outcomes. Pre-disaster recovery planning also promotes greater participation in a non-disaster environment. Within the perspective of building back better, this actively will involve creating disaster scenarios, determining the key areas of intervention, and establishing post-disaster recovery organization. Key inputs to this activity are the risk assessments as well as lessons learned from earlier disaster rehabilitation and recovery experiences.

Implementation Mechanism

At the Regional level, implementation of the RDRRMP shall take place through the integration of DRRM into relevant regional plans such as the Philippine Development Plan (PDP) as well through the development and implementation of respective action plans of government agencies for their respective activities as indicated in the RDRRMP.

Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (RDRRMC)

As explicitly stated under Republic Act 10121, the RDRRMC has the overall responsibility of approving the RDRRMP and ensuring that it is consistent with the NDRRMP. It also has the main responsibility of coordination, integration, supervision and monitoring the development and enforcement by agencies and organizations of the various laws, plans, programs, guidelines, codes, or technical standards required by this Act; managing and mobilizing resources for DRRM, including the National DRRM Fund; monitoring and providing the necessary guidelines, codes, or technical standards required by this Act; managing and providing the necessary guidelines and procedures on the Local DRRM fund (LDRRMF) releases as well as the utilization, accounting and auditing thereof.

Within the RDRRMC, four committees will be established to deal with the four thematic areas set forth in the NDRRMP and NDRRMF. These four mutually reinforcing thematic areas will be led by the four vice chairpersons (please see discussion below).

Office of the Civil Defense (OCD)

As prescribe in RA No. 10121, the Office of Civil Defense has the main responsibility of ensuring the implementation and monitoring of the RDRRMP. Specifically, it is tasked to conduct periodic assessment and performance monitoring of member-agencies of the NDRRMCs and RDRRMCs as indicated in the NDRRMP. It is also responsible for ascertaining that the physical framework, social, economic and environment plans fo communities, cities, municipalities and provinces are consistent with the NDRRMP. OCD is also tasked to make sure that all DRR programs, projects and activities requiring regional and international support shall be in accordance with duly established national policies and aligned with international agreement.

At the regional and local levels, the OCD needs to review and evaluate the Local DRRM Plans (LDRRMPs) to facilitate the integration of DRR measures into the local Comprehensive development Plan (CDP) and the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP).

Agency Leads and Implementing partners

Current government programs especially at the regional level are already contributing to the achievement of RDRRMP goals and objectives, under the RDRRMP as well as their lead and partner agencies will help in pinning down specific budget and promote better planning for appropriate and effective DRRM investments at the regional and local levels. It will also bring in synergies between different government programmed/schemes vis-à-vis the planning process and implementation.

Agency leads and implementing partner organizations and/or groups are identified in the RDRRMP to ensure the effective implementation of the RDRRMP.

RDRRMC Vice-Chairpersons – following RA 10121, the overall lead or focal agency for each of the four priority areas are the vice-chairperesons of the RDRRMC, namely:

  • Vice-Chairperson for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation: Department of Science and Technology (DOST)
  • Vice-Chairperson for Disaster Preparedness: Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
  • Vice-Chairperson for Disaster Response: Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)
  • Vice-Chairperson for Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery: National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)

Agency Leads – the following are their general duties and responsibilities:

  1. Takes the lead in initiating the implementation of the activities.
  2. Coordinates and collaborates with the different implementing partners to ensure that the activities are operationalized.
  3. Monitors the progress of the activities.
  4. Evaluates the implementation development and program efficiency.
  5. Consolidates reports from the implementing partners and submits to the respective vice chairperson of the DRRM priority area.

Implementing Partners – the following are their general duties and responsibilities:

  1. Perform the activities to achieve the specific outcomes.
  2. Work with other implementing partners within the context of coordination, collaboration and partnership.
  3. Submit reports to agency leads.

Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils (RDRRMCs)

At the regional level, the RDRRMCs shall be responsible for ensuring that DRRM-sensitive regional development plans contribute to and are aligned with the NDRRMP. The RDRRMC chairperson shall be the overall lead.

Provincial, City, Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils (P/C/MDRRMCs or Local DRRMCs)

At the local government level, it is the Local DRRM Council to ensure that DRRM is mainstreamed into their respective CDP and CLUP and other local plans, programs and budgets as a strategy in sustainable development and poverty reduction. By doing so, the LGUs will be sure that their respective DRRM programs will be included in their local budgets for each fiscal year.

The NDRRMP shall serve as an overall guide to Local DRRM Office in formulating the LDRRMP. The LDRRMP shall in turn provide inputs to effectively mainstream DRRM into the CDP and CLUP.

Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Offices (LDRRMOs)

The LDRRMOs at the provincial, city and municipal levels and the Barangay Development Councils shall design, program and coordinate DRRM activities consistent with the NDRRMP and develop the Local DRRM Plan of their respective LGUs. The LDRRMPs shall be consistent and aligned with the NDRRMP. Likewise, this office shall take the lead in implementing the LDRRMP.

To do this, the office shall:

  1. Facilitate and support risk assessments and contingency planning activities at the local level;
  2. Consolidate local disaster risk information which includes natural hazards, vulnerabilities and climate change risks and maintain a local risk map;
  3. Formulate and implement a comprehensive and integrated LDRRMP in accordance with the national, regional and provincial framework and policies on DRR in close coordination with the local development councils (LDCs).
  4. Prepare and submit to the local sanggunian through the LDRRMC and the LDC the annual LDRRMO Plan and budget, the proposed programming of the LDRRMF, other dedicated DRRM resources and other regular funding source/s and budgetary support of the LDRRMO/BDRRMC.
  5. Conduct continuous disaster monitoring.
  6. Identify, assess and manage the hazards, vulnerabilities and risks that may occur in their locality.
  7. Disseminate information and raise public awareness.
  8. Identify and implement cost-effective risk reduction measures/strategies.
  9. Maintain a database of human resources, equipment, directories and local critical infrastructures and their capacities such as hospitals and evacuation centers.
  10. Develop, strengthen and operationalize mechanisms for partnership or networking with the private sector, CSOs, and volunteer groups.

Resource Mobilization

At the national and local levels, the following sources can be tapped to fund the various DRRM programs and projects:

  1. General Appropriations Act (GAA) – through the existing budgets of the national line and government agencies.
  2. National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (NDRRMF)
  3. Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF)
  4. Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF)
  5. Donor Funds
  6. Adaptation and Risk Financing Assistance
  7. Disaster Management Assistance Fund (DMAF)he above

Aside from the above fund sources, the NDRRMP will also tap into the non-monetary resources available which can help attain the targets identified in this plan, namely:

  1. Community – based good practices for replication and scaling up
  2. Indigenous practices on DRRM
  3. Public – Private – Partnerships
  4. DRR and CCA networks of key stakeholders

Monitoring and Evaluation

Feedback mechanisms are important aspects of gauging performance targets and learning from experiences on the ground. The RDRRMP, being a long term plan which outlasts political terms,  administrations and leaderships, need to be constantly reviewed in terms of its relevance and impact on the changing situations on the ground. Monitoring and evaluation are essential components of results-based programming in DRRM as these will ensure the plans’ on- time implementation and that lesson from past experiences become input to the plan altogether. Also, through monitoring and evaluation activities to the implementation mechanisms, in case more appropriate ones are realized. These will be led by the office of Civil Defense, in close coordination with the RDRRMP and its Committees, and will focus on relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. A standard monitoring and evaluation template will be developed by the OCD together with the members of the Technical Management Group (TMG).

Monitoring and evaluation will use the indicators, targets and activities identified in each of the four thematic areas of the RDRRMP (refer to Annex E for some examples of means of verification). The indicators set in the NDRRMP will be applicable on both the national and local levels. The local level targets will be operationalized in the respective local DRRM plans which the LGUs need to develop through their respective local DRRM offices and councils. Customization of the targets will depend on the risk assessments and analysis done in their respective local areas. As regards the monitoring of the specific outputs and activities, this will be overseen by the respective chairpersons of the NDRRM Council to make sure that the activities are delivered efficiently and effectively.

This will also include an audit report on the use and status of the National DRRM Fund and how the said fund contributed to the attainment of the RDRRMP.

Throughout all activities ensuring “RESILIENT, SAFER AND SECURED EASTERN VISAYAS THROUGH AN EMPOWERED CITIZENRY” will be the main focus. It will be essential that this learning is captured and shared amongst the various stakeholders, leaders, and partners. Throughout its implementation, reporting on the progress on the RDRRMP will be communicated through various media and partners, making sure that the learning are shared effectively. These will then feed into the RDRRMP, making it adaptive to the changing situations and needs on the ground. In the Monitoring and Evaluation activities, it will be essential to link up the learning from the RDRRMP implementation with that of the NCCAP and other related plans.

RA 10121 requires the NDRRMC through the OCD to submit to the Office of the President, Senate and House of Representatives, within the first quarter of the succeeding year, an annual report relating to the progress of the implementation of the NDRRMP.

Table 8. Steps for the Monitoring RDRRMP Process

Level Step Lead
LGU Level 1.     Local DRRM offices, together with key relevant stakeholders and partners will take the lead in the process by looking into their progress vis-à-vis their local DRRM plan’s targets. A report will be submitted to the Local DRRM Council Local DRRM Office
2.     The Local DRRM Council will prepare validation report through their respective DRRM committees. Once finalized, a report will be submitted to the Regional DRRM Council Local DRRM Council
Regional Level 3.     The Regional DRRM Councils, through their four DRRM committees, will monitor and evaluate at the regional level. A consolidated regional DRRM report will be submitted to the National DRRM Office through the Office of Civil Defense. Regional DRRM Council
National Level 4.     The implementing partners in each of the outcomes and/or activities identified under the NDRRMP will submit a report on the progress of the implementation to the lead agency in each of activities. Implementing Partners
5.     The Lead Agency will consolidate the reports and submit to the appropriate National DRRM Committee. Lead Agency
6.     The National DRRM Committees will evaluate and come up with a consolidated report for each of the priority areas. The report will be submitted to the respective Vice  Chairperson on DRRM (i.e., DOST, DILG, DSWD, and NEDA) National DRRM Committees
7.     The Office of Civil Defense will consolidate all the reports from the regional DRRM councils and the national DRRM committees to come with a consolidated monitoring, evaluation and progress report on the NDRRMP. Office of Civil Defense
8.     Based on the report on the progress of the NDRRMP implementation , the OCD will likewise use these information  to look into the country’s implementation progress on the HFA commitments and targets using the matrix below as a guide
9.     Once completed, the reports will be presented in  multi-stakeholder workshop/meetings for further inputs and validation
10.   The NDRRMP progress and evaluation report and the country HFA implementation will be finalized.

 

HFA Monitoring Tool

Section 2-B of RA 10121 states that as a policy, the states needs to adhere to and adopt the universal norms, principles and standards of humanitarian assistance and the global effort on risk reduction as a concrete expression of the country’s commitment to overcome human sufferings due to recurring disasters.

In line with this, the RDRRMP will likewise make use of the HFA Monitor online tool to capture the information on progress in HFA, generated through the multi-stakeholder review process. The primary purpose of the tool is to assist the countries to monitor and review their proress and challenges in the implementation of disaster risk reduction and recovery actions undertaken at the national level, in accordance with the Hyogo framework’s priorities.

The Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council will use this as a working format to undertake regional multi-stake holder consultation processes to review progress and challenges in implementation of risk reduction and recovery actions. The template will help the regional coordinating authority to discuss and record inputs from various partners in a systematic manner.

Annex 2b: World Vision International Mainstreaming Template

Disaster Response                                                        (DRRM Plan Thematic Area)                                                                       DRRM Fund (5%)
Goal (Impact) Objectives Outcome Output Activities
Provide life preservation and meet basic subsistence need of affected population based on acceptable standards during and iimediately after a disater Decrease the number of preventable deaths and injuries Well-established disaster Response Operations Functional ICS established Structure & Training
Established system of info gathering, reporting and dissemination info
Establsihed coordinating system for relief operations System
Adequate and Prompt assessment of needs and damages at all levels Organized Assessment Team Organize & Train  AT
Damage Assesment and Need Analysis Conducted DANA Trng
Integrated and coordinated Search, Rescue and Retrieval (SRR) Capacity SRR System develop and implemented Organ, Train & Accredit SSR
Safe and timely evacuation of affected communities Evacuation system or procedures established or in-place Train, Warn, signages
Agency Coodination mechanism established MoA, Implementation Arrangement
Provide basic subsistence needs of affected [population Temporary shelter needs adequately addressed # of adequately equipped evac center (e.g., areas for nursing mothers)
# of evac center compliant with minimum set of shelter standards
# of evac center with CHILD-FRIENDLY spaces (e.g.learning areas)  
# of evac center providing orientation services (e.g.livelihood trng programs)
# of evac center providing separate areas for animals (e.g.livestocks, poultry, pets, etc.)
Basic social services provided (Inside/ Outside Evac Center) Available Medical consultation & nutrition assessement established
Available Water quality assessment services established  
Road Clearings systems in-place
Available database of hospitals/ clinics to deal with casualties
Lifeline restoration system estabished or in-place
Psychosocial needs addressed Existing Psychosocial programs and referrals in-place
Coodination mechanism with MHPSS (Mental Health and Psycho-social services) establsihed
Trauma/CISD services in-place
Immediately restore basic social services Coordinated, integrated system for Early Recovery Livelihood/ income generating assistnace programs established  
Partnership mechanisms with utility providers (power, water, communiation) providers established
Preparedness
Goal Objectives Outcome Output Activities
Increased and strengthened capacities of communities to anticipate, cope and recover from negative impacts of emergency occurrence and disaters Increase level of communty awareness to risks, vulnerabilities and threats and impacts of hazards Increased level of awareness and enhanced capacity of community to deal with threats and impact of hazards # of IEC materials developed
# of IEC campaign conducted
# Target population reached
Equip communities with necessary skilss to cope with the impact of disater Communities are equipped with necessary skills and capability to cope with the impact of disaters # of communities trained
# of teams trainined
# of DRRM Managers and decission makers trained
# of DRRM-CCA materials developed for formal education
# of training programs developed
Increase capacity of institutions Increased DRRM-CCA capacity of local DRRM Councils and offices at all levles Operational and reliant-DRRM Councils Resolution, Offfice, Budget, staff
Fully-functioning DRRM Offices Resolution, Offfice, Budget, staff
Develop and implement DRRM policies, plans and systems Developed and implemented comprehensive local preparedness and response policies, plans and systems Approved disaster risk preparedness and response plans Signed & Adopted CP
ICS institutionalized
Strengthen partnerships among key players and stakeholders DRRM Team institutionalized DBM,CSC, Budget
Integrated info system, protocols and procedures established
Prevention and Mitigation
Goal Objectives Outcome Output Activities
Avoid hazards and mitigate their potential impacts by reducing vulnerabilities and exposure and enhancing capacities of communities Reduce vulnerability and exposure of commnties to all hazards DRRM-CCA mainstreamed and integrated in local and sectoral development policies. Policies and budget 100% utilization of 5% LDRRMF for implementation program 70%
DRRM mainstreamed in CLUP and CDP, laws, policies and ordinaces DRRM-CCA in AIP
DRRM council and offices created and functional Resolution
DRRM-CCA-sensitive environmental management DRRM and CCA are integral objectives of environment-related policies and plans including land use and natural resource management DRR-Climate proofing of plans & policies
Increased disater resilience of infrastructure systems DRRM-CCA integrated in the building code and ordinances BC compliant
Vulnerability and risk inventory and assessment for critical facilities and infra conducted DTI Inspection
Guidelines for re-design, retrofitting or operational modification of critical infra established
Enahnce capacities of communties to cope and reduce their risk to impacts of hazards Community-based and scientific DRRM-CCA assessment, mapping, analysis and monitoring conducteds Available Hazard data and vulnerability info for key sectors
Monitoring and dissemenation systems for hazard and vulnerabilities are in-place
Developed or strengthened local research method and tools for multi-risk assement and cost benefit analysis
Functional knowledge management center for repository of data, products and info
Capacity enhancement of LGU and communties on vulnerability assessment, analysis and monitoring
Communities have access to effective and applicable disater risk financing and insurance insured critical government assets insurance
Risk financing options accessible and available to communties
End-to-end monitoring systems, forecasting and early warning established or improved Early Warning System (EWS) established Rainfal & Ground survey, Cross-section studies
Local policies on EWS developed, established and implemented warning& com protocols, signages
Disaster Rehabilitation and Recovery
Goal Objectives Outcome Output Activities
Restore and improve facilities, livelihood and living conditions and organizational capacities Restore economic activities, business and livelihood of affected areas Damages, losses and Needs Assessed Strategic Action Plan for hazard-prone areas
Economic restoration activities strengthened or expanded Needs identified for assistance  
Available local livelihood support and restoration programs  
Credit facilities available  
Restore shelter and other building/ installation DRRM-CCA incorporated in human settlements Appropriate safety code implemented
Available safe relocation and resettlement area
Housing cum livelihood programs established or available
Acessible basic social social services, cash/food for work, etc.  in relocation sites  
Reconstruct infrastructure and other public utilities Disaster and Climate-Change resilient infrastructure Restored/rehab infrastructure facilities according to safety standards
Resilient transport infra and facilities
Licensing/ Permit Issuance criteria for critical infrastructure
Assist physical and psychological rehab of affected communities A psychologically sound, safe and secured citizenry Post-disater/Conflict needs Assessment Guidelines developed/ in-place
Risk protection programs established/ developed or in-place
Capacity  building for psycho-social care providers conducted

Source: Allen Molen, World Vision International, Tacloban City

 

Annex 2c: UNDAF Commitments

SUB OUTCOME GROUP GOAL POLICY FRAMEWORK PARTNERS INDICATORS INDICATIVE RESOURCES AREAS OF INTEREST
AGENCY USD (M)
4.1: Disaster Risk Reduction and Management UNDAF:

By 2018, vulnerable communities and the national and local governments will

be better able to manage natural and human-induced disaster risks.

National Development Goal:

“Enhanced resilience of natural systems and improved adaptive capacities of human communities to cope with environmental

hazards including climate-related risks, by (i) strengthening institutional capacities of national and local governments for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction and management; (ii) enhancing the resilience of natural systems; and (iii) improving adaptive capacities of communities.” (Chapter 10, Goal 3, Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016)

National/Sector Policy or Programme Framework

•       Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010

•       Philippine Agenda 21

International Commitments

•       Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015

•       UN Policy for Post-Con! ict Employment Creation, Income Generation and Reintegration

•       UN Humanitarian Response Cluster System

•       Agenda 21

National/Sub-national Agencies

ARMM, BFP, CSOs, DA, DENR, DND, DOE, DOH, DOLE, DSWD, DTI, HLURB, HUDCC, LGUs, MinDA, NAPC, NCIP,

NDRRMC, NEDA, OCD, OPAPP, TESDA

 

UN Agencies

FAO, ILO, IOM, UNDP, UNEP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UN Habitat, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNV, WFP, WHO

 

Development Partners

AECID, AusAID, CIDA, DIPECHO, WB

% damages and losses following natural and human-induced disasters

Baseline: TBD

Target: 50% reduction from baseline

 

% allocation for DRRM of budgets by national and local governments

Baseline: TBD

Target: 30% increase (in millions) over baseline

 

% decrease in mortalities following natural and human-induced disasters

Baseline: TBD

Target: 50% from baseline

 

% displaced people following natural and human-induced diasters

Baseline: TBD

Target: 50% decrease from baseline

FAO 2.5 Policies, plans and mechanisms

•       DRRM integration into national policies, plans and programmes based on hazard risk, vulnerability and capacity assessments

•       DRRM integration into local policies, plans and programmes based on hazard risk, vulnerability and capacity assessments

•       Implementation of priority DRRM mitigation and preparedness actions at national and local levels

Competency building

•       Technical training and skills development on DRRM including community-based DRRM

•       Institutionalisation of DRRM capacity-building programmes

•       Strengthening of DRMM networks and partnerships

Knowledge management

•       Development of new or strengthening of existing facilities or institutions functioning as DRRM knowledge hubs

•       DRRM knowledge products development and dissemination

•       Establishment of DRMM community of practice

IOM 2
UNDP 5.5
UNESCO 2.5
UNFPA 2
UNICEF 10.8
UNV .05
WFP 3.3
WHO 4
TOTAL 32.65
4.2: Climate Change Adaptation UNDAF:

By 2018, capacities of vulnerable communities to adapt to climate change will

have been enhanced.

National Development Goal:

“Enhanced resilience of natural systems and improved adaptive capacities of human communities to cope with environmental

hazards including climate-related risks, by (i) strengthening institutional capacities of national and local governments for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction and management; (ii) enhancing the resilience of natural systems; and (iii) improving adaptive capacities of communities.” (Chapter 10, Goal 3, Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016)

 

National/Sector Policy or Programme Framework

•       Climate Change Act of 2009

•       National Framework Strategy on Climate Change 2010-2022

•       National Climate Change Action Plan

•       Philippine Agenda 21

International Commitments

•       UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

•       Agenda 21

National/Sub-national Agencies

CCC, DILG, DOST, NEDA, Sectoral NGAs (DA, DAR, DENR, DOE, DOH, DOLE, DPWH, DTI, HLURB, HUDCC

 

UN Agencies

FAO, IAEA, ILO, IOM, UNDP, UNEP, UNESCO, UN Habitat, UNIDO, UNV, WFP, WHO

 

Development Partners

ADB, AECID, AusAID, EU, GEF, GIZ, JICA, WB

% mortalities, morbidities and economic loss from extreme meteorological / met-induced events

Baseline: TBD

Target: 25% from baseline (reduce)

 

% of productivity of sectors affected by climate change

Baseline: TBD

Target: 25% from baseline (increase/ decrease)

FAO 4 Policies, plans and mechanisms

•       Climate-proo ng national, regional and local plans and regulatory processes

•       Vulnerability and adaptability assessments for all plans (national ­ regional and local levels)

•       Development of revised planning and programming guidelines re! ecting climate change parameters in analytical procedure

Competency building

•       Development and piloting of competency development programme(s) for relevant national and local government agencies

•       Development and piloting of competency development programme(s) for communities

•       Climate and impact ®

•       monitoring system(s) developed and tested at national, regional and local levels

•       Development of competencies in use of technologies for agricultural production particularly in relation to the effects of climate change

Knowledge management

•       Development and/or strengthening of CCA KM and technical support system(s)

•       Development/pilot testing of KM /technical support system(s) for communities

IAEA 1
ILO 1
IOM 1
UNDP 20.5
UNESCO 5.525
UNEP .04
UNFPA .5
UN Habitat .1
UNIDO 6
UNV .05
WFP 4
WHO 1.2
TOTAL 44.957
4.3: Environment and Natural Resources Conservation and Protection UNDAF:

By 2018, capacities of national and local government o! cials and

communities to conserve and sustainably manage the country’s environment

and natural resources, including biodiversity and sustainable energy sources

will have been enhanced.

National Development Goal:

“Improved conservation, protection and rehabilitation of the natural resources and improved environmental quality for a cleaner and healthier environment.” (Chapter 10, Goals 1 and 2, Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016)

National/Sector Policy or Programme Framework

•       ENR Framework

•       Updated Forestry Master Plan

•       Philippine Agenda 21

•       National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plan (NBSAP)

•       Renewable Energy Act of 2008

•       Electric Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA) 2001

International Commitments

•       Agenda 21

•       Convention on Biological Diversity

•       UN Convention to Combat Desertication

•       Rotterdam Convention

•       Stockholm Convention

•       Basel Convention

•       Montreal Protocol

National/Sub-national Agencies

Congress, DENR, DILG, DOST, HUDCC, HLURB, Judiciary (SC), other sectoral NGAs (e.g. DA, DAR, DOE, DOH, DOTC, DTI)

 

UN Agencies

FAO, IAEA, UNDP, UNESCO, UN Habitat, UNIDO, UNV, WHO

 

Development Partners

ADB, AECID, AusAID, EU, GEF, GIZ, JICA, WB

% degradation rates of critical environment and natural resources parameters

Baseline: TBD

Target: 50% from baseline (decrease)

 

% productivity of ENR sub-sectors over baselines

Baseline: TBD

Target: 25% over baseline (increase)

 

% rates of renewable energy development / use and energy efficiency

Baseline: TBD

Target: 30% over baseline (increase)

FAO 2.5 Policies, plans and mechanisms

•       Rationalization of ENR, including energy, policy development, planning and programming supported to address overlaps, conflicts and gaps

•       Establishment of multi-stakeholder ENR/sustainable energy consultative mechanisms

•       Development of guidelines/tools on harmonized ENR valuation; carrying capacity assessment; integrated ENR assessment

Competency building

•       Development and implementation of competency development (CeD) programme(s) for key ENR/sustainable energy actors

•       Integrated ENR management and sustainable energy development and utilization models demonstrated in selected critical ecosystems/pilot areas

•       Development of competency in use of technologies for detection and environmental pollution

Knowledge management

•       Strengthening of existing ENR/sustainable energy KM systems

•       Development/Improvement and dissemination of selected existing ENR/sustainable energy KM systems products

•       Pilot testing of selected KM model(s) pilot

•       Development of information database on environmental pollutants

IAEA 1
UNDP 25.5
UNESCO 1.5
UN Habitat .050
UNIDO 2
UNV .05
WFP 4
WHO .6
TOTAL 37.150
Source: UNDAF for the Philippines 2012-2018

 

Annex 2d: CBDRRM Modules–Basic Instructor’s Guide (BIG)

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1: Philippine Disaster Context and the Importance of CB DRRM
  • Local and National Disaster Context and Experience
  • Basic Concepts of DRRM and CCA and mitigation
  • The CBDRRM Approach
  • Legal Basis of CBDRRM
  1. Module 2: Steps in Undertaking CBDRRM
  • Community Risk Assessment
  • Participatory Planning for CBDRRM
  • Strengthening Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Committee (BDRRMC)
  • Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation of the BDRRM Plan
  1. Module 3: Preparedness, Prevention and Mitigation
  • Revisit: definition and importance of disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation
  • National warning system to help and support family and community disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation
  • Community preparedness, prevention and mitigation
  • Early Warning
  • Evacuation Plan
  • Public Awareness Raising
  • Structural and non-structural mechanisms for prevention and mitigation
  1. Module 4: Mechanism in Responding to Disaster and Preparation for Rehabilitation and Recovery
  • Disaster Response
  • Community Response
  • General Tasks during Disasters
  • Evacuation Center Management
  • Relief Distribution
  • Specialized Response
  • First Aid
  • Water Rescue
  • Management of the Dead and Missing
  • Psychosocial Support
  • Preparation for Rehabilitation and Recovery
  1. Module 5: Action Planning

The capacities being developed in the course of the module are the following:

  1. Basic knowledge on Disaster and DRRM
  2. Knowledge on RA 10121
  3. Skills in four thematic areas: preparedness, prevention/mitigation, response, rehabilitation and recovery
  4. Skills in Community Risk Assessment
  5. Crafting of early warning system
  6. Conduct of drill
  7. Crafting of public awareness
  8. Emergency Response skills (relief delivery operation; damage assessment/needs assessment)

Note: this module has already gone piloting from National (participated in by National Agencies) to regional, municipal and city up to barangay. The module is being enhanced and finalized from pilot processes undertaken.

Annex 2e: Summary of the 17 Social Development Goals

Goal 1.   End poverty in all its forms everywhere

1.1    By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day

1.2    By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions

1.3    Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable

1.4    By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance

1.5    By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters

1.a    Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions

1.b    Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro-poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions

Goal 2.   End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2.1    By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round

2.2    By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons

2.3    By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment

2.4    By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality

2.5    By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed

2.a    Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries

2.b    Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round

2.c     Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility

Goal 3.   Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

3.1      By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births

3.2      By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under‑5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births

3.3      By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases

3.4      By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being

3.5      Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol

3.6      By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents

3.7      By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes

3.8      Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all

3.9      By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

3.a      Strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate

3.b      Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and non-communicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines, in accordance with the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, which affirms the right of developing countries to use to the full the provisions in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights regarding flexibilities to protect public health, and, in particular, provide access to medicines for all

3.c       Substantially increase health financing and the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health workforce in developing countries, especially in least developed countries and small island developing States

3.d      Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks

Goal 4.   Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

4.1      By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes

4.2      By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education

4.3      By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university

4.4      By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship

4.5      By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations

4.6      By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy

4.7      By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development

4.a      Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all

4.b      By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries

4.c       By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing States

Goal 5.   Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

5.1      End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere

5.2      Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation

5.3      Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation

5.4      Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate

5.5      Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life

5.6      Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences

5.a      Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws

5.b      Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women

5.c       Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels

Goal 6.   Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

6.1      By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all

6.2      By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations

6.3      By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

6.4      By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity

6.5      By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate

6.6      By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes

6.a      By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies

6.b      Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management

Goal 7.   Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

7.1      By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services

7.2      By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

7.3      By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

7.a      By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology

7.b      By 2030, expand infrastructure and upgrade technology for supplying modern and sustainable energy services for all in developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their respective programmes of support

Goal 8.   Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

8.1      Sustain per capita economic growth in accordance with national circumstances and, in particular, at least 7 per cent gross domestic product growth per annum in the least developed countries

8.2      Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors

8.3      Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services

8.4      Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10‑Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production, with developed countries taking the lead

8.5      By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value

8.6      By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training

8.7      Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms

8.8      Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment

8.9      By 2030, devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products

8.10    Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all

8.a      Increase Aid for Trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, including through the Enhanced Integrated Framework for Trade-related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries

8.b      By 2020, develop and operationalize a global strategy for youth employment and implement the Global Jobs Pact of the International Labour Organization

Goal 9.   Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

9.1      Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all

9.2      Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry’s share of employment and gross domestic product, in line with national circumstances, and double its share in least developed countries

9.3      Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets

9.4      By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

9.5      Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending

9.a      Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States

9.b      Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities

9.c       Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

10.1    By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average

10.2    By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status

10.3    Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard

10.4    Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality

10.5    Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations

10.6    Ensure enhanced representation and voice for developing countries in decision-making in global international economic and financial institutions in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate institutions

10.7    Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies

10.a    Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements

10.b    Encourage official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to States where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes

10.c    By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

11.1    By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums

11.2    By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons

11.3    By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries

11.4    Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage

11.5    By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations

11.6    By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

11.7    By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities

11.a    Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional development planning

11.b    By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels

11.c    Support least developed countries, including through financial and technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

12.1    Implement the 10‑Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries

12.2    By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources

12.3    By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses

12.4    By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment

12.5    By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

12.6    Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle

12.7    Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

12.8    By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature

12.a    Support developing countries to strengthen their scientific and technological capacity to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production

12.b    Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products

12.c    Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions, in accordance with national circumstances, including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist, to reflect their environmental impacts, taking fully into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries and minimizing the possible adverse impacts on their development in a manner that protects the poor and the affected communities

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts[13]

13.1    Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

13.2    Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

13.3    Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

13.a    Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible

13.b    Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities

Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

14.1    By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution

14.2    By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

14.3    Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels

14.4    By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics

14.5    By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information

14.6    By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation[14]

14.7    By 2030, increase the economic benefits to small island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

14.a    Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries

14.b Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets

14.c Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of “The future we want”

Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

15.1    By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements

15.2    By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

15.3    By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world

15.4    By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development

15.5    Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

15.6    Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources, as internationally agreed

15.7 Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products

15.8    By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species

15.9    By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts

15.a    Mobilize and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems

15.b    Mobilize significant resources from all sources and at all levels to finance sustainable forest management and provide adequate incentives to developing countries to advance such management, including for conservation and reforestation

15.c    Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities

Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

16.1    Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere

16.2    End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children

16.3    Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all

16.4    By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime

16.5    Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms

16.6    Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels

16.7    Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels

16.8    Broaden and strengthen the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance

16.9    By 2030, provide legal identity for all, including birth registration

16.10  Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements

16.a    Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime

16.b    Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development

Finance

17.1    Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection

17.2    Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of gross national income for official development assistance (ODA/GNI) to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries; ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries

17.3    Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources

17.4    Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress

17.5    Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries

Annex 2f: In Summary—the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-20130

Scope and Purpose

The present framework will apply to the risk of small-scale and large-scale, frequent and  infrequent, sudden and slow-onset disasters, caused by natural or manmade hazards as well as related environmental, technological and biological hazards and risks.  It aims to guide the multi-hazard management of disaster risk in development at all levels as well as within and across all sectors.

Expected Outcome

The substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries .

Goal

Prevent new and reduce existing disaster risk through the implementation of integrated and inclusive economic, structural, legal, social, health, cultural, educational, environmental, technological, political and institutional measures that prevent and reduce hazard exposure and vulnerability to disaster, increase preparedness for response and recovery, and thus strengthen resilience.

Targets

  • Substantially reduce global disaster mortality by 2030, aiming to lower average per 100,000 global mortality between 2020-2030 compared to 2005-2015;
  • Substantially reduce the number of affected people globally by 2030, aiming to lower the average global figure per 100,000 between 2020-2030 compared to 2005-2015;
  • Reduce direct disaster economic loss in relation to global gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030;
  • Substantially reduce disaster damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services, among them health and educational facilities, including through developing their resilience by 2030;
  • Substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020;
  • Substantially enhance international cooperation to developing countries through adequate and sustainable support to complement their national actions for implementation of this framework by 2030; and
  • Substantially increase the availability of and access to multi- hazard early warning systems and disaster risk information and assessments to people by 2030.

Priorities for Action

There is a need for focused action within and across sectors by States at local, national, regional and global levels in the following four priority areas.

Priority 1: Understanding disaster risk

Disaster risk management needs to be based on an understanding of disaster risk in all its dimensions of vulnerability, capacity, exposure of persons and assets, hazard characteristics and the environment.

Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk

Disaster risk governance at the national, regional and global levels is vital to the management of disaster risk reduction in all sectors and ensuring the coherence of national and local frameworks of laws, regulations and public policies that, by defining roles and responsibilities, guide, encourage and incentivize the public and private sectors to take action and address disaster risk.

Priority 3: Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience

Public and private investment in disaster risk prevention and reduction through structural and non-structural measures are essential to enhance the economic, social, health and cultural resilience of persons, communities, countries and their assets, as well as the environment. These can be drivers of innovation, growth and job creation. Such measures are cost-effective and instrumental to save lives, prevent and reduce losses and ensure effective recovery and rehabilitation.

Priority 4: Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to «Build Back Better» in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction

Experience indicates that disaster preparedness needs to be strengthened for more effective response and ensure capacities are in place for effective recovery. Disasters have also demonstrated that the recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction phase, which needs to be prepared ahead of the disaster, is an opportunity to “Build Back Better” through integrating disaster risk reduction measures. Women and persons with disabilities should publicly lead and promote gender-equitable and universally accessible approaches during the response and reconstruction phases.

Guiding Principles

  • Primary responsibility of States to prevent and reduce disaster risk, including through cooperation.
  • Shared responsibility between central Government and national authorities, sectors and stakeholders as appropriate to national circumstances.
  • Protection of persons and their assets while promoting and protecting all human rights including the right to development.
  • Engagement from all of society.
  • Full engagement of all State institutions of an executive and legislative nature at national and local levels.
  • Empowerment of local authorities and communities through resources, incentives and decision-making responsibilities as appropriate.
  • Decision-making to be inclusive and riskinformed while using a multi-hazard approach.
  • Coherence of disaster risk reduction and sustainable development policies, plans, practices and mechanisms, across different sectors.
  • Accounting of local and specific characteristics of disaster risks when determining measures to reduce risk.
  • Addressing underlying risk factors cost-effectively through investment versus relying primarly on postdisaster response and recovery.
  • «Build Back Better» for preventing the creation of, and reducing existing, disaster risk.
  • The quality of global partnership and international cooperation to be effective, meaningful and strong.
  • Support from developed countries and partners to developing countries to be tailored according to needs and priorities as identified by them.

Annex 3: Summary of Activities Conducted in 2015 by OCD Region 8 Report

Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Services

DRRM Policy services

Conducted Regional DRRM Plan Review and Updating Workshop on 26-29 October 2015 at Hotel Alejandro, Tacloban City.

Capacity Building Initiative Services

Fifteen (15) Capacity Building Initiative Services were provided by this office as follows:

  • Regional CP Formulation Workshop held at Hotel Alejandro, Tacloban City on September 22-24, 2015.
  • Training of Trainers (ToT) on Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA) to 40 RDRRMC members held at the Leyte Park Resort Hotel on February 9 to 13, 2014.
  • PDNA Training to 38 participants from the Province of Southern Leyte on August 3-7, 2015 at Tierra de Milagros, Palo, Leyte.
  • PDNA Training to 38 participants from the Province of Leyte on September 1-5, 2015 at Leyte Park Hotel, Tacloban City.
  • PDNA Training to 40 participants from the Province of Northern Samar on September 7-11, 2015 at Hotel Alejandro, Tacloban City.
  • PDNA Training to 38 participants from the Province of Biliran on September 21-25, 2015 at Tierra de Milagros, Palo, Leyte.
  • PDNA Training to 40 participants from the Province of Samar on September 28 to October 2, 2015.
  • Orientation on DRRM to 40 members of the Radio Communications Group on September 9, 2015 at Ritz Tower de Leyte, Tacloban City.
  • Training of Trainers (ToT) on RDANA to 38 RDRRMC members held at Tierra de Milagros, Palo, Leyte on October 5-7, 2015.
  • Orientation on Pre-Disaster Risk Assessment (PDRA) to 38 RDRRMC members held at Tierra de Milagros, Palo, Leyte on October 6, 2015.
  • Integrated Planning (IP) Course on Incident Command System (ICS) to 25 representatives from response agencies held at Hotel Alejandro, Tacloban City on October 19-23, 2015.
  • Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA) Training to 38 participants from the Province of Eastern Samar held at Tierra de Milagro s, Palo, Leyte on October 26-30, 2015.
  • Position Courses on Incident Command System (ICS) held at Hotel Alejandro on November 4-8, 2015.
  • All-Hazards Incident Management Team Training (AHIMT) on Incident Command System (ICS) to 38 representatives from response agencies and LGUs held at Hotel Alejandro, Tacloban City on November 23-27, 2015.
  • Training of Trainers (ToT) on Community-based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (CBDRRM)to 40 participants from the northern municipalities of Eastern Samar held at Leyte Park Hotel, Tcloban City on November 16-20, 2015.

Other Technical Assistance

Local DRRM Plan Formulation Workshops facilitated (2):

  • MDRRM Plan Formulation Workshop for the municipality of Salcedo, Eastern Samar held at Caluwayan Beach Resort, Marabut Samar on July 13-16, 2015.
  • MDRRM Plan Formulation Workshop for the municipality of Anahawan, So. Leyte on October 20-22, 2015 at Kuting Reef, Macrohon, So. Leyte.

Annex 3a: International Agencies with DP/DRR/CBDRRM Projects in Region 8

Location Partner Agency Status
Province Municipality
Biliran Cabucgayan UNDP Planned
Biliran Naval UNDP Planned
E Samar Balangiga IOM Completed
E Samar Balangkayan IOM Completed
E Samar Balangkayan PLAN Ongoing
E Samar Balangkayan UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Balangkayan UNDP Planned
E Samar City Of Borongan (Capital) IOM Completed
E Samar Giporlos UNDP Planned
E Samar Guiuan Action Aid Ongoing
E Samar Guiuan DCSA-JP/Cordaid Ongoing
E Samar Guiuan IOM Completed
E Samar Guiuan PLAN Ongoing
E Samar Guiuan UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Hernani IOM Completed
E Samar Hernani PLAN Ongoing
E Samar Hernani UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Lawaan IOM Completed
E Samar Lawaan UNDP Planned
E Samar Mercedes Action Aid Ongoing
E Samar Mercedes IOM Completed
E Samar Mercedes UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Mercedes UNDP Planned
E Samar Quinapondan UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Salcedo Action Aid Ongoing
E Samar Salcedo IOM Completed
E Samar Salcedo PLAN Ongoing
E Samar Salcedo UNDP Ongoing
E Samar Salcedo US Peace Corps Ongoing
E Samar Taft IOM Completed
Leyte Alangalang SCI Ongoing
Leyte Alangalang SCI Planned
Leyte Alangalang WVI Ongoing
Leyte Albuera Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Carigara IOM Completed
Leyte Dagami WVI Ongoing
Leyte Dulag Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Dulag WVI Ongoing
Leyte Jaro SCI Ongoing
Leyte Jaro SCI Planned
Leyte Kananga IRW Ongoing
Leyte Matag-Ob IRW Ongoing
Leyte Matag-Ob WVI Ongoing
Leyte Merida Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Merida WVI Ongoing
Leyte Ormoc City Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Ormoc City HELP Planned
Leyte Ormoc City MERCY Malaysia Completed
Leyte Ormoc City UNDP Ongoing
Leyte Ormoc City UNDP Planned
Leyte Ormoc City WVI Ongoing
Leyte Palo CRS Ongoing
Leyte Palo UNDP Ongoing
Leyte Pastrana Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Santa Fe Action Aid Ongoing
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) CFSI Ongoing
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) IOM Completed
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) OXFAM-Tacloban Ongoing
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) PLAN Ongoing
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) UNDP Ongoing
Leyte Tacloban City (Capital) WVI Ongoing
Leyte Tanauan CRS Ongoing
Leyte Villaba IRW Ongoing
Leyte Villaba WVI Ongoing
Samar Basey Action Aid Ongoing
Samar Basey FHP Ongoing
Samar Basey IOM Completed
Samar Basey NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing
Samar Basey NCCP-ACT Alliance Planned
Samar Marabut Action Aid Ongoing
Samar Marabut FHP Ongoing
Samar Marabut IOM Completed
Samar Marabut NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing

Source: UNRC Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annex 3b: Summary of UNICEF DRR Projects with LGUs and NGOs 2015, as of September 2015

Name of Project/ DRR Activities Fund
Provided
Location Implementing
Partner
Status
Municipalit/ City Province
Establishment of Early Warning Devices in identified areas for flood monitoring          100,250.00 Balangiga Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Establishment of Flood EWS 311,000.00 Balangiga Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Roll-out of CCDRR to barangays (13 brgys.)          623,600.00 Balangiga Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Contingency planning (Flood)            46,000.00 Balangiga Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Roll-out of CCDRR to LGU staff            49,500.00 Balangiga Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Balangiga Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet Completed
Roll-out training on child-centred DRR for the MDRRMC            80,700.00 Balangkayan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
(Second) workshop on updating of MDRRM Plan            45,500.00 Balangkayan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Roll-out training on child-centred DRR for the BDRRMCs          276,100.00 Balangkayan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Balangkayan Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Hazard Mapping including map reproduction 590,175.00 Borongan City Eastern Samar LGU-CDRRMO Completed
Establishement, procurement and installation of Early Warning Devices (Manual) 452,000.00 Borongan City Eastern Samar LGU-CDRRMO On going
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Borongan City Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Construction of Evacuation Center – Enhancing Resiliency in Public Building USD470, 000.00 Borongan City Eastern Samar IOM-UNICEF On going
Municipal DRRM & CCA Planning – Training-Workshop (Municipal Level) (in Tacloban City)          127,200.00 Giporlos Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Roll out of CCDRR in 5 at-risk barangays of Giporlos. Expected output will be their BDRRMC Plan          275,500.00 Giporlos Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Giporlos Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Conduct multi-hazard drive/drills in schools and community            93,600.00 Guiuan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Conduct of multi-hazard drills drive to schools focusing on Grades 4 and 5  (~60 schools, esp. island brgys.)          369,300.00 Guiuan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
CBCCDRR information drive for day care center workers (60 pax from selected brgys.)            72,600.00 Guiuan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Guiuan Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Construction of Evacuation Center – Enhancing Resiliency in Public Building USD470, 000.00 Guiuan Eastern Samar IOM-UNICEF On going
Disaster Risk Reduction Management and climate change adaptation orientation          361,200.00 Hernani Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Contingency planning (Typhoon)          162,000.00 Hernani Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Training on handling children in emergencies for emergency response team in each barangay (13 brgys.)          622,250.00 Hernani Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Hernani Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Training on Disaster Preparedness for BDRRMC, Teachers, and LGU Employees 88,650.00 Lawaan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Skills Training for school children on emergency response 89,100.00 Lawaan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Lawaan Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Simultaneous Disaster Preparedness Trngs.,/ Seminars/Drills at School Level            58,000.00 Mercedes Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Classroom Lectures /Orientation on Disaster Preparedness by Trained Teachers          259,500.00 Mercedes Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Establishment of Early Warning Systems: Signage, Preparedness Equipment          464,250.00 Mercedes Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Simulation of Child-Centered Risk Assessment, Vulnerability & Other Science Based Technology & Methodology Research Activities            98,000.00 Mercedes Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Barangay Land Use / Hazard Mapping/Map Digitizing & Processing          154,400.00 Mercedes Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Mercedes Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
CapDev Training in updating CLUP          106,400.00 Quinapondan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Capdev training in updating and participatory planning for CLUP (session 2)            81,400.00 Quinapondan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
(Roll-out) TOT on child-centred DRR for the MDRRMO/C          100,800.00 Quinapondan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
(Roll-out) TOT on child-centred DRR for the BDRRMCs          353,250.00 Quinapondan Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Quinapondan Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Family emergency and disaster preparedness planning              1,449.00 Salcedo Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
TUHATU (Tuna, Hangin, Tubig) environmental youth camp (with focus on creative and interactive activities on DRR and CCA)          434,650.00 Salcedo Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Drills and simulation on earthquake, tsunami, and storm surge          326,040.00 Salcedo Eastern Samar LGU-MDRRMO On going
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Salcedo Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
Symposia/camp on disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation for students (2 HS and 24 GS)          322,600.00 Marabut Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Roll-out of CCDRR for Barangay Officials (24 Brgy.)          213,700.00 Marabut Samar LGU-MDRRMO Completed
Mobilising Local CSOs and Child Participation in Safer Schools Monitoring and Child-centered DRR Marabut Eastern Samar ESSDOG/ EVNet On going
TOT on child-centred DRRM 207,900.00 Alang-alang Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Roll-out to 54 BDRRMCs on child-centred DRRM 474,700.00 Alang-alang Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Roll-out to 57 Day Care Workers 108,100.00 Alang-alang Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
LGU children and youth DRR and CCA summit 185,500.00 Alang-alang Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Formulation of Community-based and Scientific Risk Assessment and Hazard Map Additional 49 Remaining Barangays 537,850.00 Burauen Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Map Digitizing, GPS,  Brgy. OJT 252,350.00 Burauen Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Provision of GIS mapping computer equipment 65,000.00 Burauen Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Training and Orientation Sessions – Family Disaster Preparedness (7 brgys. @ 15 person/brgy.) for pilot test 44,410.00 Carigara Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Orientation meeting on organizing the Mun. ERT 26,000.00 Carigara Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Contingency planning (CP) workshop and writeshop 318,450.00 Carigara Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Establishment of early warning system (cross-visits) 92,000.00 Carigara Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Community-based DRRM Training (Households and Child-Centered) 208,000.00 Dagami Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Condcut of Drills/ Simulation on Flood EWS and Evacuation (Schools) 170,000.00 Dagami Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Continuous IEC on Risk Reduction Management at the Community and Schools (Elementary) 100,000.00 Dagami Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Installation of Flood Water Level Gauges (Child Friendly) 150,000.00 Dagami Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Roll-out of training on CCDRR (live-in) 422,980.00 Dagami Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Training workshops on development of child-friendly DRRM materials Dulag Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Finalization workshop on development of child-friendly DRRM materials Dulag Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
CBMS Updating 82,800.00 Jaro Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
LGU Monitoring Visit 69,000.00 Jaro Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Orientation/Seminar of Elementary School Teachers on Fire and Earthquake Drills 442,800.00 Jaro Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Organization of school-based Emergency Response Team, with drill/simulations (Training for 80 Grade 5 students) 494,810.00 Julita Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Establishment of EWS in hard-to-reach barangays (training of brgy. officials and school heads on radio use and communication protocol of MDRRMO) 180,700.00 Julita Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Multi-Hazard drills and simulation for 80 Primary School Students 130,870.00 Julita Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Establishment of EWS for 35 brgys & procurement of “one-school-one-radio” in 14 schools in 35 brgys. 92,075.00 La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Seminar/Workshop on EWS and “one-school-one-radio” for 35 brgys. 138,000.00 La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Establishment of EWS for 35 brgys and procurement of “one-school-one-radio” in 14 schools in 35 brgys. (expansion of 2a.1) La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Seminar/Workshop on EWS and “one-school-one-radio” for 35 brgys. (expansion of 2a.2) La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
First Aid Training for Youth Community Volunteers La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
First Aid Training for School Disaster Coordinators and MDRRMC Rescue Team La Paz Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct of Drills/Simulations on FEWS and Evacuation (Schools) 174,000.00 Mayorga Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Roll-out training on CCDRR to MDRRMC & BDRRMCs 502,000.00 Mayorga Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Capacity Building for Children and Youth for their Awareness on Child Protection, Child Participation and Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction 125,000.00 Palo Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Training and Orientation Sessions – Family Disaster Preparedness            (7 brgys. @ 15 person/brgy.) for pilot test 44,410.00 Palo Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct drills to all kinds of calamities to school children (Elementary and Secondary) Pastrana Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Strengthening BDRRMC in their role and functions Pastrana Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Drill, Orientation and Establishment of Early Warning System Device 145,000.00 Pastrana Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct Swimming Lesson to children and youth (adolescents) 209,500.00 Pastrana Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct Workshop/awareness on women and Children and other Vulnerable Sector in DRR 124,300.00 San Miguel Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Simulation exercise (with a scenario on handling children during emergencies) for ICS and ERTs 605,890.00 San Miguel Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct Workshop for awareness on women and Children and other Vulnerable Sector in DRR 625,600.00 Tabontabon Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Creation and Reproduction of DRRM and Climate Change Adaptation IEC Material and Children Storybooks (Waray-waray translated) 505,500.00 Tacloban Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
5-day Basic Life Support & First Aid Training for Boys/Girls Scouts, Other youth volunteers 175,000.00 Tacloban Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
1-Day Radio Communication Operations and Minor Maintenance Training for 31 Brgys. Provided with Portable Radios by UNDP 28,100.00 Tacloban Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
3-day DRRM Training/Orientation for Public Schools 112,500.00 Tacloban Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Briefing/Orientation on GIS Mapping for LGU Policy/Decision- 10,625.00 Tanauan Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Packaging & Production of Environmental Friendly IEC Materials (2-day activity) 340,200.00 Tanauan Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Strengthening of BDRRMCs on their Roles and Functions 810,000.00 Tanauan Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Conduct of Community/School Drills 75,000.00 Tanauan Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Training on handling children in emergencies for emergency response team Tanauan Leyte LGU-MDRRMO
Source: UNICEF Tacloban
 

 

 

 

 

 

Annex 4: Summary of DRRM Frameworks of UNDAF Outcome Group 4 Members (Draft)

AGENCY FOCUS AREA DEFINITION OF RESILIENCE AND OTHER COMMON TERMINOLOGIES USED PHASE INVOLVEMENT IN DRRM CONTINUUM INTERVENTIONS TOOLS AND ACTIVITIES GOVERNMENT PARTNER
FAO Food and agricultural production systems ·     Resilience – The ability to prevent disasters and crises as well as to anticipate, absorb, accommodate or recover and adapt from them  in a timely, efficient and sustainable manner. This includes protecting, restoring and improving food and agricultural production systems under threats that impact agriculture, food and nutrition security and food safety (and related public health)

·     Other common terms: risks, prevention, mitigation, response

All phases Capacity building of LGUs in the development of DRRM plans NGAs

LGUs (provincial and municipal agriculturists)

WFP Food and nutrition security ·     Resilience – The ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate to and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions

·     Other common terms:risks, hazard, mitigation, early warning systems

Prevention to Rehabilitation Assessments

Risk mitigation

Capacity building

LGUs (provincial and municipal level)

Barangays (thru NGOs)

UNICEF Women and children below 18 years old ·     Resilience – The ability of children, communities and systems to withstand, adapt to, and recover from stresses and shocks advancing the rights of every child, especially the most disadvantaged

·     Other common terms: response, risks (formula incorporates capacity)

Prevention to response and early recovery Mapping

Capacity building

Provision of facilities

NGAs

LGUs (provincial and municipal level)

 

WHO Health sector ·     Resilience – Ability to resume functions of health sector as soon as possible

·     Other common terms: risks, disasters

Prevention to response Disaster surveillance

Vulnerability assessments

Capacity building

NGAs

Regional health units

UNFPA Women and girls between 15 to 49 years old ·     Resilience – (none provided)

·     Other common terms: response

Preparedness to rehabilitation Advocacy on the adoption of MISP (international standard of RH care) in DRRM planning NGA

LGUs

UNIDO Industries ·     Resilience – (none provided)

·     Other common terms: risks, mitigation

Prevention, response and rehabilitation Mobilization of resources and best practices International agreements on industrial development
UNDP Cross-cutting ·     Resilience – recognition that there is no such thing as “zero risk”; instead being able to bounce back

·     Other common terms:risk, hazard, impact/consequence, frequency

Prevention, Mitigation, Preparedness, Rehabilitation, Transition to development Hazard mapping

Capacity building

NGAs
UN HABITAT   Prevention, Mitigation, Preparedness, Rehabilitation, Transition to development
ILO   Prevention to rehabilitation

Source: Draft OG4 Study, FAO-UNDP

 

 

 

 

 

Annex 5: Summary of CRRP Cluster Results

Sector/Cluster Agency Project/Activity Status/Results Lessons Learned Key Issues
Livelihood DTI Shared Service Facility (SSF) 55 SSFs distributed to Cooperators (industry/trade associations, cooperatives, NGOs, POs, etc.) in Region 6 & 8
43 SSFs in Regions 6, 7 and 8 are under procurement.
Livelihood Seeding Program (LSP) 3,719 individual beneficiaries in Regions 6, 7, and 8 trained and given livelihood starter kits;
Micro enterprises that were started or re-started consist of sari-sari stores, trading, handicrafts and furniture making, food processing, native delicacy making, food vending, marine-based production.
Procurement of 678 livelihood starter kits is on-going.
Negosyo Center 106 Negosyo Centers established as of October 15, 2015, 18 of which located in Yolanda-affected areas. These 18 NCs continue to operate until today.
Eight of 10 Negosyo Centers in the Yolanda-affected areas are managed by LGUs; 2 are based in DTI offices.
Enterprise Rehabilitation Financing (ERF) of the Small Business Corporation (SB Corp) As of 1 October 2015, Php 418 M worth of loans released to borrowers in Palawan, Region65, Northern Cebu, and Region 8.
Actual average loan size under the ERF is Php 1.1 M, indicating focus on micro and small enterprises.
Coconut Industry Recovery and Rehabilitation for Eastern Visayas A plan has been drafted. The industry has attracted potential investors.
PCA Coconut Timber Disposal 10 million totally damaged trees cut and disposed of in Regions 6, 7 and 8, benefitting 29,806 families.
Coconut Replanting 37,253 hectares replanted with coconuts, benefitting 14335 families.
Coconut Land Fertilization 25,855 hectares of coconut plantation fertilized, benefitting 15,186 families.
Inter-cropping 17,083 hectares of coconut land intercropped with vegetables and other crops, benefitting 5,551 families
BFAR Mariculture 10 mariculture parks assisted (IEC, trainings, workshops, orientation seminars; 2,551 trainings conducted
Repair of Fishing Boats and Provision of Marine Engines Damaged fishing boats of 28,781 fisherfolks repaired.
Lost fishing boats of 3,585 fisherfolks replaced; replacement of 5,658 fishing boats is on-going.
Procurement of 3,722 marine engines is on-going.
Provision of Fishing Gears and Paraphernalia

 

76,589 fishing gears and paraphernalia given to 46,145 fisherfolks.
DOLE Emergency Employment 40,952 individuals received emergency employment assistance.
Integrated Livelihood Program 47,319 beneficiaries assisted.
DA Cash for Work Php 10K given to farmer who planted corn on 1 hectare of farm land.
Clearing: 18,324 hectares of farm land cleared, benefitting 31,470 families.
De-silting: 704 linear meters of irrigation canals, operated by both LGU and NIA, have been cleared of debris and de-silted.
Provision of Planting Materials 3,998,787 pcs of coconut, abaca, banana, and cacao planting materials distributed to farmers.
4,000 kgs of ginger planting materials distributed to multiplier farms (543 farmer-beneficiaries.
232,604 bags of certified and hybrid rice seeds distributed to 69,733 farmer-beneficiaries.
31,507 bags of corn seeds distributed to 32,791 farmer-beneficiaries.
32,781 kgs of assorted vegetable seeks distributed to 42,700 farmer-beneficiaries.
Provision of Other Farm Inputs 309,324 bags of various types of fertilizers distributed to 6 LGUs in Regions 6 and 8.
29,828 sets of farm tools distributed to 20,267 farmer-beneficiaries.
Ten units of 4-wheel drive tractors (2 units donated by the private sector) were deployed for farm clearing operations and land preparation activities.
39,436 units of agricultural supplies and equipment distributed to farmer–beneficiaries.
Insurance Premium for Crops, Livestock and Poultry 2,559 farmer-beneficiaries were given insurance for their crops, livestock and poultry.
TESDA Livelihood Skills Training (includes construction-related trainings) 24,535 trainings were conducted in Palawan, Regions 6 and 8.
31,130 trainees graduated from these trainings; 23,006 graduates gained employment.
DSWD Cash for Building Livelihood Asset (CBLA) 113 CBLA projects completed in 2015, benefitting 49,021 families.
Livelihood Assistance Grant (LAG) 214 LAG projects completed in 2015, benefitting 14,646 families.
DOST Community Empowerment thru Science and Technology Reached/benefitted 1,033 communities.
Social Services DSWD Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) ESA grants given to 987,545 families out of 1,028,329 target families (96 percent).
Support for Resettlement DSWD strenghtened and institutionalized partnership with the LGUs, UN Agencies, local and international NGOs, CSOs, and private donors in implementation of support programs and projects for communities in resettlement sites.
DOH Medical Support for Yolanda Victims Full operational status of Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center has resumed; 17 doctors, 1,058 nurses and 593 midwives deployed; RH commodities given to 324,537 women of reproductive age; micro-nutrient supplementation given to 506,198 children.
Resettlement NHA Permanent Housing Total housing need is 205,128 in Regions 4-B, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 13. Total funds released as of 30 October 2015 was Php 27B. With the amount, NHA targets the completion of 92,554 housing units. 1)  Finding land suitable for resettlement (1,367 hectares are needed for 205,128 housing units; total funding requirement is Php61.2B; land should be titled; land should be in safe areas; clearances should be secured from MGB and PHIVOLCS
Of the total target, 17,641 units have been completed. Construction of 42,566 units is ongoing. In all, NHA targets the completion of 21,455 units by December 2015, another 42,566 by June 2016, and finally 28,533 units by December 2016. 2)   Procurement process takes 3 months

3)   Permits and licenses from government agencies (DAR conversion and NIA clearance is used for agriculture; development permit from LGU; ECC from DENR; tax exemption from BIR)

Infrastructure DPWH Rehabilitation/reconstruction of damaged sections of roads and bridges[15] 1)    National Roads—of total physical target of 107 kilometers (KMs), reconstruction of 60 KMs has been completed (88 projects); reconstruction of 38 KMs is ongoing; and procurement for 7.3 KMs is ongoing.

2)    National Bridges—of the total physical target of 1,852 linear meters (LMs), reconstruction of 1,118 LMs has been completed; reconstruction of 640 LMs is ongoing; procurement for 94.8 LMs is ongoing.

3)    Access Roads—total physical target of 1.7 KM has been completed.

Of the total target of 110 projects, reconstruction of 77 projects has been completed, reconstruction of 17 is ongoing; procurement for 8 projects is ongoing.

Thirty-six out of 48 target have been completed; construction of 11 buildings is ongoing; procurement for 1 building is ongoing.

1)   Assessment of infrastructure needs, validation, and preparation of engineering requirements completed later than targeted due to extent and location of damaged structures.

2)  Failure of bidding due to ineligibility of bidders or no takers for small-budget projects.

3)  Technical capacity of LGUs in the preparation of Plans and Program of Works and in the implementation of projects.

Rehabilitation/reconstruction of Flood Control Structures
Rehabilitation/reconstruction of damaged government buildings
Of 25 buildings (municipal facilities) targeted for reconstruction, 2 buildings have been completed; 14 buildings are ongoing construction; 1 building for procurement.
Road Heightening and Tide Embankment for Tacloban, Palo and Tanauan, Leyte Endorsed by RDC8 with qualifications.
DepEd Classroom Construction and Rehabilitation Of 2,313 classrooms targeted for construction (new), 1,026 have been completed, 928 are ongoing, 359 are at various stages of procurement.
School Furniture Target of 292,166 units of furnitures for delivery: 121,950 units have been completed; 170,216 are under procurement.
DILG Repair/Rehabilitation of Partially Damaged LGU Facilities Completed 292 of 309 projects under RAY 1
DOH Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center Full operations resumed. New EVRMC construction ongoing (Building 1: 45 percent completed; Building 2: 33 percent completed).
CHEd Rehabilitation of State Universities and Colleges (28) Of 606 target projects, 412 have been completed; 191 ongoing; 3 for procurement.
Repair of CHEd Regional Office building has been completed.
Support Services DBM Fund for CRRP Yolanda CRRP has total funding requirement of Php150B. Total amount of funds released as of 31 October 2015 was Php94B.
FAiTH Pledges (Foreign Aid) Total amount of foreign aid pledged was Php73.3B, consisting of cash (Php45.1B) and non-cash (Php28.2B). Total amount of foreign aid received was Php17.23B (or 23.3 percent of total aid pledged), consisting of cash received by government (Php1.2B), non-cash received by government (Php1.2B), and cash/non-cash received by NGOs, multilateral organizations, etc. (Php14.8B).
Sources: Cluster reports submitted by DTI, NHA, DPWH, DSWD and DBM. Copies can be accessed online at http://yolanda.neda.gov.ph/reports/cluster-reports/

 

 

 

 

Annex 5a: Summary of the No. of Sustainable Livelihood Program Modalities Provided to Pantawid & Non-Pantawid Participants (CY 2015)

PROVINCE/ MUNICIPALITY Modality(ies) provided to the SLP Participant Modality(ies) provided to the SLP Participant
Seed Capital Fund PEAF Skills Training CBLA SEA-K SCF MFI NGA/ LGU Physical Assets PEAF Skills Training CBLA Self-funded
P NP P NP P NP P NP
SAMAR (WSAMAR) 694 37 820 68 695 1019 2,474 731 187 19 661 888 1714 93
ALMAGRO 47 15 47 47 15
BASEY 462 7 448 261 462 7 448
CALBAYOG CITY 86
CALBIGA 546 185
CITY OF CATBALOGAN 181
HINABANGAN 77 10 415 87 90
JIABONG 264
MARABUT 37 232 1014 37 1246
MATUGUINAO 6 15 5 20 3 6 20
MOTIONG 156
PAGSANGHAN 81
PINABACDAO 52 42 94
SAN JOSE DE BUAN 177
SAN SEBASTIAN 6 10 16 16 16
SANTA MARGARITA 18 49 2 18 2
SANTO NIÑO 65 65 65 1
TAGAPUL-AN
TALALORA 639 6 645 645
TARANGNAN 120 120 120
VILLAREAL 6
LEYTE 1,560 2,091 8 24 567 382 5270 11408 4,252 3,651 13 105 557 32 949 16678 1
ABUYOG 109 24 25 133 25
ALANGALANG 113 168 264 552 179 281 816
ALBUERA 22 48 2 799 1151 309 70 2 1950
BARUGO 381 1519 1900
BATO 138
BURAUEN 9 10 199 19
CALUBIAN 162
CAPOOCAN 8 22 20 30 30 20
CARIGARA 90 90
CITY OF BAYBAY 5 491 1131 490 5 1622
DULAG 130 77 2 189 207 2
HILONGOS 161 96 382 1 257
HINDANG 53 47 62 1 100
INOPACAN 46 28 74
ISABEL 3 103 103 3
JARO 58
JAVIER (BUGHO) 17 374 146 17 374
JULITA 17 13 30 30
LA PAZ 15 10 25
MACARTHUR 12 68 2 327 12 70
MAHAPLAG 72 146 333 1820 22 218 2153
MATAG-OB 87 16 103
MATALOM 56 19 110 75
MAYORGA 68 86 883 1372 37 154 2255
MERIDA 71 214 4 7 1 13 190 400 28 285 13 463 11 14 590
PALOMPON 14 382 1862 14 2244
PASTRANA 39 30 63 58 13 2 39 69 11 121 15 1
SAN ISIDRO 15 11 508 673 26 1181
SAN MIGUEL 38 38 38
SANTA FE 185 295 185
TABONTABON 84 101 98 110 111 185 53 208
TACLOBAN CITY 43 33 342 352 559 76 694
TANAUAN 340 1,061 1,401
TOLOSA 119 37 156
TUNGA 143 562 239 705
BILIRAN 116 251 3 29 2032 1117 294 367 32 3149
ALMERIA 506 157 663
BILIRAN 20 21 274 174 283 41 448
CABUCGAYAN 27 49 3 29 76 32
CAIBIRAN 69 181 515 353 11 250 868
NAVAL (CAPITAL) 737 433 1170
EASTERN SAMAR 1,213 988 85 2 11866 383 30 2,201 30 5 87 12249
ARTECHE 2593 30 4 2593
BALANGIGA 61 149 210
BALANGKAYAN 204 196 56 860 130 400 56 990
GENERAL MACARTHUR 386 241 285 144 627 429
GIPORLOS 76 64 73 140 73
GUIUAN 5 21 2 11 26 13
LAWAAN 25 75 13 57 100 70
LLORENTE 395 90 29 2 1498 485 9 31 1498
MAYDOLONG 12 56 831 31 68 862
MERCEDES 26 58 84
ORAS 2695 2695
QUINAPONDAN
SALCEDO 23 38 7 10 61 17
SAN JULIAN 816 816
SAN POLICARPO 2193 17 5 2193
SOUTHERN LEYTE 15 1 235 120 1824 2755 1,155 16 828 355 4579
ANAHAWAN
BONTOC 607 16 607 607
CITY OF MAASIN 150 10 136 160 160
HINUNANGAN 21 33 106 50 54
HINUNDAYAN 72
LIBAGON 143
LILOAN 103
MACROHON 33
PADRE BURGOS 1 6 1 1
PINTUYAN
SAINT BERNARD 7 10 152 7 10 10
SAN JUAN (CABALIAN) 83
SAN RICARDO
SILAGO 8 1 53 77 293 775 47 9 130 1068
SOGOD 924 1980 127 2904
TOMAS OPPUS 131
NORTHERN SAMAR 175 14 128 1,643 22 34 189 128
ALLEN 22 30 22 22 22
BOBON 150
CATARMAN 607
CATUBIG 15
GAMAY 51
LAPINIG 86
LAS NAVAS 77 14 70 12 91
LAVEZARES 141
PALAPAG 448
PAMBUJAN 15
SAN JOSE 30
SAN ROQUE 76 128 76 128
Grand Total 3,598 3,368 8 24 1885 615 21815 16682 9,848 6,966 230 146 2085 32 2500 38497 94

 

Annex 5b. List of INGOs with Livelihood and Livelihood-related projects[16] in Region 8 (as of November 2015)

INGO LOCATION Status INGO LOCATION Status
Province Municipality Province Municipality
ACF Leyte Dulag Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH WSamar Pinabacdao Completed
ACF Leyte Palo Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH WSamar San Sebastian Completed
ACF Leyte Tacloban City Completed CFSI Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
ACF Leyte Tanauan Completed CFSI Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
ACF Leyte Tolosa Completed CFSI WSamar Basey Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing CFSI WSamar Basey Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing CFSI WSamar Marabut Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Childfund Leyte Alangalang Completed
ACTED Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing Childfund Leyte Albuera Completed
ACTED Eastern Samar Macarthur Ongoing Childfund Leyte Capoocan Completed
ACTED Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing Childfund Leyte Dulag Completed
Action Aid Leyte Albuera Ongoing Childfund Leyte Kananga Completed
Action Aid Leyte Merida Ongoing Childfund Leyte Ormoc City Completed
AMG Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing Childfund Leyte Palo Completed
CARE Leyte Albuera Completed Childfund Leyte Pastrana Completed
CARE Leyte Albuera Ongoing Childfund Leyte San Miguel Completed
CARE Leyte Barugo Ongoing Childfund Leyte Tacloban City Completed
CARE Leyte Carigara Ongoing Childfund Leyte Tanauan Completed
CARE Leyte Dagami Completed Christian Aid Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed
CARE Leyte Dagami Ongoing Christian Aid Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
CARE Leyte Isabel Ongoing Christian Aid Eastern Samar Hernani Completed
CARE Leyte Jaro Ongoing Christian Aid Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed
CARE Leyte Kananga Ongoing Christian Aid Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed
CARE Leyte La Paz Completed Christian Aid Eastern Samar Quinapondan Planned
CARE Leyte Merida Ongoing Christian Aid Eastern Samar Salcedo Completed
CARE Leyte Ormoc City Completed Christian Aid Eastern Samar Salcedo Planned
CARE Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing Christian Aid Leyte Dulag Completed
CARE Leyte Pastrana Completed Christian Aid Leyte Macarthur Completed
CARE Leyte San Isidro Ongoing Christian Aid Leyte Macarthur Planned
CARE Leyte Santa Fe Completed Christian Aid Leyte Mayorga Completed
CARE Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing Christian Aid Leyte Ormoc City Completed
CARE Leyte Tabontabon Completed Christian Aid Leyte Tolosa Completed
CARE Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing Christian Aid WSamar Basey Completed
CARE Leyte Tunga Ongoing Christian Aid WSamar Marabut Completed
CARE WSamar Basey Completed CRS Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
CARE WSamar Basey Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing
CARE WSamar Catbalogan City Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
CARE WSamar Santa Rita Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Eastern Samar General MacArthur Completed CRS Leyte Palo Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed CRS Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Albuera Completed CRS Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Carigara Completed CRS Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Ormoc City Completed DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte San Isidro Completed DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
CDRC-LCDE-DKH WSamar Calbiga Completed DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned
ECOWEB, Inc. Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing FAO Leyte Villaba Completed
ECOWEB, Inc. Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing FAO WSamar Basey Completed
ECOWEB, Inc. Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing FAO WSamar Basey Ongoing
ECOWEB, Inc. Leyte Dulag Ongoing FAO WSamar Marabut Completed
FAO BILIRAN Cabucgayan Ongoing FAO WSamar Marabut Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed FAO WSamar Santa Rita Completed
FAO Eastern Samar General MacArthur Ongoing FAO WSamar Santa Rita Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing FHP WSamar Basey Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed FHP WSamar Basey Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing FHP WSamar Marabut Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Hernani Completed FHP WSamar Marabut Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Mercedes Completed GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned
FAO Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing GOAL Eastern Samar San Julian Ongoing
FAO Eastern Samar Salcedo Completed GOAL Eastern Samar Sulat Ongoing
FAO Leyte Abuyog Completed GOAL Leyte Jaro Ongoing
FAO Leyte Abuyog Ongoing Handicap International Leyte Alangalang Completed
FAO Leyte Alangalang Ongoing Handicap International Leyte Pastrana Completed
FAO Leyte Albuera Ongoing Handicap International Leyte Tacloban City Completed
FAO Leyte Babatngon Completed Help from Germany Eastern Samar Giporlos Planned
FAO Leyte Babatngon Ongoing Help from Germany Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned
FAO Leyte Barugo Ongoing Help from Germany Eastern Samar Hernani Planned
FAO Leyte Burauen Completed Help from Germany Leyte Alangalang Planned
FAO Leyte City Of Baybay Ongoing Help from Germany Leyte Ormoc City Planned
FAO Leyte Dagami Completed Help from Germany Leyte San Miguel Planned
FAO Leyte Dulag Completed Help from Germany Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
FAO Leyte Dulag Ongoing Help from Germany Leyte Tanauan Planned
FAO Leyte Jaro Completed HUMEDICA Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
FAO Leyte Javier (Bugho) Ongoing IRW-Philippines Leyte Kananga Ongoing
FAO Leyte Kananga Completed IRW-Philippines Leyte Villaba Ongoing
FAO Leyte La Paz Ongoing IsraAID Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
FAO Leyte Leyte Ongoing Lutheran World Relief Leyte Burauen Ongoing
FAO Leyte Macarthur Completed Lutheran World Relief Leyte Jaro Ongoing
FAO Leyte Macarthur Ongoing Lutheran World Relief Leyte Kananga Ongoing
FAO Leyte Mayorga Completed Lutheran World Relief Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
FAO Leyte Mayorga Ongoing Muslim Aid Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
FAO Leyte Merida Ongoing Muslim Aid Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
FAO Leyte Ormoc City Completed NCCP-ACT Alliance Leyte Albuera Ongoing
FAO Leyte Palo Completed NCCP-ACT Alliance Leyte Tacloban City Completed
FAO Leyte Palompon Ongoing NCCP-ACT Alliance WSamar Basey Completed
FAO Leyte San Isidro Completed NCCP-ACT Alliance WSamar Marabut Completed
FAO Leyte Tabango Ongoing NCCP-ACT Alliance WSamar Santa Rita Completed
FAO Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
FAO Leyte Tanauan Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
FAO Leyte Tolosa Completed Oxfam Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
FAO Leyte Tolosa Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
Oxfam Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
Oxfam Eastern Samar Hernani Completed Save the Children Leyte Tolosa Planned
Oxfam Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing SCI Leyte Julita Completed
Oxfam Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing SCI Leyte Palo Completed
Philippines Communitere Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing SCI Leyte Palo Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing SCI Leyte Tanauan Completed
PIN Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing SCI Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing SCI Leyte Tanauan Planned
PIN Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing SCI Leyte Tolosa Completed
PIN Eastern Samar Llorente Ongoing SCI Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Llorente Ongoing SCI Leyte Tolosa Planned
PIN Eastern Samar Maydolong Ongoing TdH Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Maydolong Ongoing TdH Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing TdH Eastern Samar Llorente Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing TdH WSamar Basey Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing TdH WSamar Marabut Ongoing
PIN Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing Triangle G H Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing UNDP BILIRAN Biliran Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Completed UNDP BILIRAN Biliran Planned
Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNDP BILIRAN Cabucgayan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Planned UNDP BILIRAN Cabucgayan Planned
Save the Children Leyte Dulag Completed UNDP BILIRAN Caibiran Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Dulag Ongoing UNDP BILIRAN Naval Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Dulag Planned UNDP BILIRAN Naval Planned
Save the Children Leyte Jaro Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed
Save the Children Leyte Jaro Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Jaro Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
Save the Children Leyte Julita Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte La Paz Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
Save the Children Leyte La Paz Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Mayorga Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Mercedes Completed
Save the Children Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Mayorga Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed
Save the Children Leyte Palo Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Palo Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Salcedo Completed
Save the Children Leyte Tacloban City Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing UNDP Leyte Dulag Completed
Save the Children Leyte Tacloban City Planned UNDP Leyte Ormoc City Completed
Save the Children Leyte Tanauan Completed UNDP Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Tanauan Ongoing UNDP Leyte Palo Completed
Save the Children Leyte Tanauan Planned UNDP Leyte Palo Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Tolosa Completed UNDP Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNDP WSamar Basey Ongoing WVI Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
US Peace Corps Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing WVI Leyte Villaba Completed
WVI Leyte Alangalang Completed WVI Leyte Villaba Ongoing
WVI Leyte Alangalang Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Balangkayan Completed
WVI Leyte Dagami Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Dagami Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
WVI Leyte Dulag Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
WVI Leyte Dulag Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Hernani Completed
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Macarthur Completed
WVI Leyte Merida Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Macarthur Ongoing
WVI Leyte Merida Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed
WVI Leyte Ormoc City Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar San Julian Completed
WVI Leyte Tacloban City Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar San Julian Ongoing

Source: UNRCO Tacloban

 

 

 

 

Annex 5c. List of INGOs with Social Services-related projects[17] in Region 8 (as of November 2015)

INGO LOCATION Status INGO LOCATION Status
Province Municipality Province Municipality
ACF Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed Action Aid Leyte Dulag Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Borongan City Completed Action Aid Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Completed Action Aid Leyte Palo Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Completed Action Aid Leyte Pastrana Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Ongoing Action Aid Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed Action Aid W Samar Basey Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed Action Aid W Samar Marabut Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed ADRA Leyte Dagami Completed
ACF Eastern Samar Llorente Completed AMG Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Mercedes Completed Arche Nova Leyte Alangalang Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed Arche Nova Leyte Dulag Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar San Julian Completed Arche Nova Leyte Jaro Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar San Julian Ongoing Arche Nova Leyte Julita Ongoing
ACF Leyte Alangalang Completed Arche Nova Leyte La Paz Ongoing
ACF Leyte Albuera Completed Arche Nova Leyte Macarthur Ongoing
ACF Leyte Burauen Completed Arche Nova Leyte Mayorga Ongoing
ACF Leyte Burauen Completed Arche Nova Leyte Palo Ongoing
ACF Leyte Carigara Completed Arche Nova Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
ACF Leyte Dagami Completed Arche Nova Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
ACF Leyte Dulag Completed Arche Nova Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
ACF Leyte Dulag Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Ongoing
ACF Leyte Jaro Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
ACF Leyte Javier (Bugho) Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Albuera Ongoing
ACF Leyte Julita Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Carigara Ongoing
ACF Leyte La Paz Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte Jaro Ongoing
ACF Leyte Ormoc City Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH Leyte San Isidro Ongoing
ACF Leyte Pastrana Completed CDRC-LCDE-DKH W Samar Calbiga Ongoing
ACF Leyte Santa Fe Completed CFSI Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
ACF Leyte Tacloban City Completed CFSI Eastern Samar Mercedes Completed
ACF Leyte Tacloban City Completed Childfund Leyte Dagami Completed
ACF Leyte Tanauan Completed Childfund Leyte Dagami Completed
ACF Leyte Tolosa Completed Childfund Leyte San Miguel Completed
ACF W Samar Basey Completed Childfund Leyte San Miguel Completed
ACF W Samar Marabut Completed CRS Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Ongoing
ACF Eastern Samar San Julian Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing CRS Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
ACTED Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing CRS Leyte Burauen Ongoing
Action Aid Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing CRS Leyte Palo Ongoing
Action Aid Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing CRS Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
Action Aid Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing CRS Leyte Tacloban City Completed
DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed IMC Leyte Dagami Ongoing
DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed IMC Leyte Dulag Completed
DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing IMC Leyte Julita Completed
FHP W Samar Basey Ongoing IMC Leyte Julita Ongoing
FHP W Samar Basey Ongoing IMC Leyte La Paz Ongoing
FHP W Samar Basey Ongoing IMC Leyte Macarthur Ongoing
FHP W Samar Marabut Ongoing IMC Leyte Mayorga Completed
FHP W Samar Marabut Ongoing IMC Leyte Mayorga Ongoing
FHP W Samar Marabut Ongoing IMC Leyte Ormoc City Completed
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed IMC Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing IMC Leyte Tolosa Completed
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned INTERSOS Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing INTERSOS Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned INTERSOS Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing INTERSOS Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
GNIP Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned INTERSOS Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
GOAL Leyte Jaro Completed IRW-Philippines Leyte Kananga Ongoing
GOAL Leyte Tunga Completed IRW-Philippines Leyte Villaba Ongoing
Handicap International Leyte Alangalang Completed IsraAID Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
Handicap International Leyte Basey Completed Lutheran World Relief Leyte Ormoc City Completed
Handicap International Leyte Dagami Completed Lutheran World Relief Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing
Handicap International Leyte Jaro Completed MEDAIR Leyte Dulag Planned
Handicap International Leyte Julita Completed MEDAIR Leyte Julita Ongoing
Handicap International Leyte Marabut Completed MEDAIR Leyte La Paz Planned
Handicap International Leyte Mayorga Completed MERCY Malaysia Leyte Ormoc City Completed
Handicap International Leyte San Miguel Completed MERCY Malaysia Leyte Ormoc City Completed
Handicap International Leyte Santa Fe Completed Nazarene Disaster Response Eastern Samar Balangkayan Completed
Handicap International Leyte Tacloban City Completed Nazarene Disaster Response Leyte Ormoc City Completed
Help from Germany Leyte Isabel Ongoing Nazarene Disaster Response Leyte Tacloban City Completed
Help from Germany Leyte Isabel Ongoing NCCP-ACT Alliance Leyte Albuera Ongoing
Help from Germany Leyte Kananga Ongoing NCCP-ACT Alliance W Samar Basey Planned
Help from Germany Leyte Kananga Ongoing NCCP-ACT Alliance W Samar Marabut Planned
HUMEDICA Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed Oxfam Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
HUMEDICA Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
HUMEDICA Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
HUMEDICA Leyte Dagami Completed Oxfam Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing
HUMEDICA Leyte Julita Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
HUMEDICA Leyte Palo Ongoing Oxfam Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
HUMEDICA Leyte Tacloban City Completed PCMN Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
IMC Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing PCMN Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
IMC Leyte Albuera Completed PCMN Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
IMC Leyte Burauen Completed PCMN Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
IMC Leyte Burauen Ongoing PCMN Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
PCMN Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing Relief International Leyte Pastrana Ongoing
PCMN Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing Relief International Leyte San Miguel Ongoing
PCMN Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing Relief International Leyte Tunga Ongoing
PCMN Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Abuyog Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Dulag Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Dulag Ongoing
PCMN Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Isabel Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Kananga Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Matag-ob Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Mayorga Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Merida Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Ormoc City Completed
PCMN Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Palo Ongoing
PCMN N Samar Allen Completed Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Pastrana Completed
PCMN N Samar Catarman Completed Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Pastrana Ongoing
PCMN N Samar Lavezares Completed Samaritan’s Purse Leyte San Miguel Ongoing
Plan Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Santa Fe Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Santa Fe Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Santa Fe Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing
Plan Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tacloban City Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tacloban City Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
Plan Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tanauan Completed
Plan Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
Plan Leyte Burauen Ongoing Samaritan’s Purse W Samar Basey Ongoing
Plan Leyte Dagami Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Ongoing
Plan Leyte Dulag Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Completed
Plan Leyte Julita Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Ongoing
Plan Leyte Kananga Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Planned
Plan Leyte La Paz Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Alangalang Ongoing
Plan Leyte Macarthur Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Dulag Ongoing
Plan Leyte Mayorga Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Dulag Completed
Plan Leyte Palo Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Dulag Planned
Plan Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Jaro Ongoing
Plan Leyte Tanauan Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Jaro Completed
Plan Leyte Tolosa Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Jaro Ongoing
Plan W Samar Basey Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Jaro Planned
Plan W Samar Marabut Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Jaro Ongoing
PRC Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Javier (Bugho) Ongoing
Relief International Leyte Alangalang Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Julita Ongoing
Relief International Leyte Barugo Ongoing Save the Children Leyte La Paz Ongoing
Relief International Leyte Carigara Ongoing Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Ongoing
Relief International Leyte Jaro Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
Relief International Leyte Julita Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Palo Ongoing UNDP Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Palo Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Santa Fe Completed UNDP Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed
Save the Children Leyte Tanauan Completed UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Tolosa Completed UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
SCI Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed
SCI Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
SCI Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Completed
SCI Leyte Alangalang Planned UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
SCI Leyte Dulag Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
SCI Leyte Dulag Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangkayan Completed
SCI Leyte Dulag Planned UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
SCI Leyte Jaro Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
SCI Leyte Jaro Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
SCI Leyte Jaro Completed UNICEF Eastern Samar Borongan City Completed
SCI Leyte Jaro Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Borongan City Ongoing
SCI Leyte Javier (Bugho) Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Borongan City Completed
SCI Leyte Julita Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Borongan City Completed
SCI Leyte La Paz Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Borongan City Ongoing
SCI Leyte Macarthur Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Ongoing
SCI Leyte Macarthur Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Gen MacArthur Completed
SCI Leyte Macarthur Planned UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
SCI Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
SCI Leyte Palo Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
SCI Leyte Palo Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
SCI Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed
SCI Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
SCI Leyte Tacloban City Planned UNICEF Eastern Samar Giporlos Ongoing
SCI Leyte Tanauan Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
SCI Leyte Tolosa Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
TdH Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
TdH Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
TdH Eastern Samar Llorente Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Completed
TdH W Samar Basey Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
TdH W Samar Marabut Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
UNDP Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Completed
UNDP Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Completed UNICEF Leyte Albuera Completed
Save the Children Leyte Macarthur Planned UNICEF Leyte Barugo Ongoing
Save the Children Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Burauen Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Burauen Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Completed UNICEF Leyte Burauen Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Capoocan Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed UNICEF Leyte Carigara Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Carigara Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Carigara Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed UNICEF Leyte Carigara Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Completed UNICEF Leyte Carigara Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Dagami Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Lawaan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Dagami Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Llorente Completed UNICEF Leyte Dagami Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Maydolong Completed UNICEF Leyte Dulag Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Maydolong Completed UNICEF Leyte Dulag Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Mercedes Completed UNICEF Leyte Dulag Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Dulag Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Dulag Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Isabel Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Mercedes Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Isabel Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed UNICEF Leyte Isabel Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Isabel Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Jaro Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed UNICEF Leyte Jaro Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Jaro Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Jaro Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Salcedo Completed UNICEF Leyte Jaro Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Javier (Bugho) Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Julita Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Julita Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar San Julian Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Julita Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar San Julian Completed UNICEF Leyte Kananga Completed
UNICEF Leyte Abuyog Completed UNICEF Leyte Kananga Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Completed UNICEF Leyte La Paz Completed
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Leyte La Paz Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Completed UNICEF Leyte La Paz Completed
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Leyte La Paz Completed
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Completed UNICEF Leyte La Paz Completed
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Completed UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Completed
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Completed UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Alangalang Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Albuera Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Completed
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Completed UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
UNICEF Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Completed UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Completed
UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Completed UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Completed
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tabontabon Completed
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Completed UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Completed UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNICEF Leyte Merida Completed UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNICEF Leyte Ormoc City Completed UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNICEF Leyte Ormoc City Completed UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Completed
UNICEF Leyte Ormoc City Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Ormoc City Completed UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palo Completed UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Palo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Palo Completed UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palo Completed UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palo Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Palompon Completed UNICEF Leyte Tolosa Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palompon Completed UNICEF Leyte Tolosa Completed
UNICEF Leyte Palompon Completed UNICEF Leyte Tolosa Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Completed UNICEF Leyte Tunga Completed
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tunga Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Ongoing UNICEF Leyte Tunga Completed
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Completed UNICEF Leyte Villaba Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Completed UNICEF W Samar Basey Completed
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Completed UNICEF W Samar Basey Completed
UNICEF Leyte Pastrana Completed UNICEF W Samar Basey Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Completed UNICEF W Samar Basey Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Ongoing UNICEF W Samar Basey Completed
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Completed UNICEF W Samar Marabut Completed
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Ongoing UNICEF W Samar Marabut Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Completed UNICEF W Samar Marabut Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Completed UNICEF W Samar Marabut Completed
UNICEF Leyte San Miguel Ongoing UNICEF W Samar Marabut Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Santa Fe Completed WVI Leyte Alangalang Completed
UNICEF Leyte Santa Fe Completed WVI Leyte Alangalang Ongoing
UNICEF Leyte Santa Fe Ongoing WVI Leyte Alangalang Completed
UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Quinapondan Completed
UNICEF Leyte Macarthur Ongoing ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Quinapondan Planned
UNICEF Leyte Mayorga Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar San Julian Planned
WVI Leyte Alangalang Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Macarthur Completed
WVI Leyte Dagami Completed ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Macarthur Planned
WVI Leyte Dagami Ongoing

Annex 5d. List of INGOs with Infrastructure-related projects in Region 8 (as of November 2015)

 

WVI Leyte Dagami Completed
WVI Leyte Dagami Completed
WVI Leyte Dagami Completed
WVI Leyte Dulag Completed
WVI Leyte Dulag Ongoing
WVI Leyte Dulag Completed
WVI Leyte Dulag Completed
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Completed
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Ongoing DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Completed DCSA-JP/Cordaid Eastern Samar Guiuan Planned
WVI Leyte Matag-ob Completed HUMEDICA Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
WVI Leyte Merida Completed IRW-Philippines Leyte Kananga Ongoing
WVI Leyte Merida Ongoing IRW-Philippines Leyte Villaba Ongoing
WVI Leyte Merida Completed Plan Eastern Samar Balangiga Ongoing
WVI Leyte Merida Completed Plan Eastern Samar Balangkayan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Ormoc City Completed Plan Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Ormoc City Completed Plan Eastern Samar Hernani Ongoing
WVI Leyte Ormoc City Completed Plan Eastern Samar Quinapondan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Tacloban City Completed Plan Eastern Samar Salcedo Ongoing
WVI Leyte Tacloban City Ongoing Plan Leyte Burauen Ongoing
WVI Leyte Tacloban City Completed Plan Leyte Dulag Ongoing
WVI Leyte Villaba Completed Plan Leyte Kananga Ongoing
WVI Leyte Villaba Ongoing Plan Leyte Mayorga Ongoing
WVI Leyte Villaba Completed Plan Leyte Tanauan Ongoing
WVI Leyte Villaba Completed Plan W Samar Basey Ongoing
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Balangkayan Completed UNDP BILIRAN Naval Planned
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Balangkayan Planned UNDP Eastern Samar Guiuan Ongoing
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Giporlos Completed UNDP Eastern Samar Salcedo Planned
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Giporlos Planned UNDP Leyte Palo Planned
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Hernani Completed UNDP Leyte Tacloban City Planned
ZOA Philippines Eastern Samar Hernani Planned UNDP W Samar Basey Ongoing

Source: UNRCO Tacloban

Annex 5e. List of NHA and INGOs with Resettlement-related projects in Region 8 (as of May 2015)

Province/City/Municipality NHA Permanent Housing Program Participation by International Agencies
Housing Need (No. of Families in High-Risk Zones) No. of Housing Units to be produced (Bid-Out) Number of Families not Covered by NHA (Target vs Bid-Out) NGOs and International Partners with Ongoing or Completed Shelter Projects, Activities[18] Status of Project Implementation
Biliran 8,905 3,534 5,371
Almeria 929 929 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Biliran 2,852 2,852 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Cabucgayan 631 631 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Caibiran 1,511 1,511 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Culaba 823 823
Naval 2,159 1,000 1,159 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Eastern Samar 7,573 1,650 5,923
Balangiga 460 460 Caritas-Germany Ongoing
    Christian Aid Completed
    International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
    Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Balangkayan 549 390 159 Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
  Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
  Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
  Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Borongan International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Gen McArthur 300 300 Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Giporlos 743 743 Ang Mananampalatayang Gumagawa, Inc. (AMG-Phil) Ongoing
  Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
  Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Guiuan 1,200 871 329 International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Hernani 989 389 600 Help from Germany Planned
  Humedica Planned
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
  Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
  Secours Islamique France Completed
  Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
  Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Lawaan 949 949 Christian Aid Completed
  Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
  Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Llorente 383 383 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Maydolong 164 164 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Mercedes 139 139 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Quinapondan 810 810 Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
  Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Salcedo 887 887 Christian Aid Completed
  Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
  US Peace Corps Ongoing
San Julian   Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Taft   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
Leyte 16,199 9,452 6,747
Alang-alang   Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Ongoing
  Handicap International Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  Save the Children Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Albuera   CARE Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing
Almeria   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Babatngon 1,774 1,774 0 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Barugo   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Baybay City 356 356 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Burauen 187 187 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Lutheran World Relief (LWR) Ongoing
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Calubian   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Capoocan   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
Carigara 3,524 1,884 1,640 Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Dagami   Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Completed
  CARE Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Dulag   Ecoweb, Inc. Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Medair Ongoing
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Inopacan 133 133
Isabel 1,912 1,912 Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Jaro   Citizens’ Disaster Response Center-Diakonie Katastrophenhlife-Leyte Center for Development Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  GOAL Completed (1), Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
  Save the Children Ongoing
Julita 150 150 Medair Ongoing
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Kananga   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
La Paz   CARE Completed
  Medair Ongoing
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Leyte   Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
MacArthur 112 112 0 Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Matag-ob 300 300 Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Mayorga 283 283 0 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Merida   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Ormoc City 1,419 1,419 CARE Completed
  Christian Aid Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Palo 1,244 169 1,075 Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Palompon 984 641 343 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Pastrana 960 960 0 CARE Completed
  Handicap International Ongoing
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
San Isidro 744 600 144 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
San Miguel 117 117 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Sta. Fe   CARE Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Tabango 200 200 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tabontabon   CARE Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tanauan 1,200 1,186 14 INTERSOS Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  OXFAM Ongoing
Tolosa 600 600 CARE Completed
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tunga   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Villaba   International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
  World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Samar 8,900 3,683 5,217
Basey 6,609 2,000 4,609 Christian Aid Completed
  International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing
  Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Marabut 1,458 500 958 Christian Aid Completed
  Food for the Hungry Philippines (FHP) Ongoing
  International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
  International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
  NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
  Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Sta. Rita 280 280 International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
  NCCP-ACT Alliance Planned
Villareal 553 553
Southern Leyte 130 0 130
Silago 130 0 130
Tacloban City 14,433 13,801 632 Christian Aid Completed (1), Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
        Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
        Humedica Ongoing
        International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
        Muslim Aid Philippines Ongoing
        NCCP-ACT Alliance Planned
        OXFAM Completed
        Plan International Ongoing
        Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
        Samaritan’s Purse Ongoing
        World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
TOTAL 56,140 32,120 24,020    
Source: UNRCO Tacloban

 

 


Annex 6: ADB Regional Knowledge Sharing Sessions

Session 1: Livelihood (13-14 October 2015, Tacloban, Philippines)
GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 DISCUSSIONS/SUMMARY
WORKSHOP 1: Will a cluster approach work effectively? Why/why not? How can the clusters ensure that livelihoods are secured and losses of income are minimized?
Two major issues:

1) securing livelihoods & properties; and

2) information dissemination

Innovative solutions:

·          Climate smart agriculture

·          DRRM in school, enterprises and community

·          Buffer stocking

·          Crop diversification

·          Intercropping

Policy implications:

·          Crop insurance

·          Mainstreaming of DRR in business development practices

·          Price monitoring

·          Gender mainstreaming to meet gender needs towards securing livelihoods

Pre-disaster Issue/Needs:

·      Formulate ways on how to protect livelihood

·      Insurance for businesses/livelihoods

·      The business community was not part of and was not consulted during the preparation for Yolanda.

·      Stocks on the ground (local) was more than enough to meet the needs of the population for three weeks. Businesses had food, water, noodles and stocks

Observations from the business sector representative:

·      “In the preparation for Yolanda, we, businessmen, were really left out. It seemed that the government did not need us. No one coordinated with us even though we had the resources.”

·      “International sources were more consistent on the information released than on the national and local level”

·      “Information on the national level was not properly disseminated. As a result, many people became too complacent.”

·      “Vulnerable groups (fishers, farmers, etc.) do not really understand the importance of insurance and have not acquired such.”

Proposed innovative solutions:

·      Based on the results of the survey conducted, access to low-cost financing is the best solution.

·      Disaster funds should be provided to these vulnerable groups

·      Protection of livelihood through insurance for fishers, farmers, sales/businesses

·      Moratorium on loans and interests

·      Encourage businesses and those engaged for profit to save 20%-40% of the total income

·      Include PCIC as member in the Livelihood Cluster

·      Policy Implications:

·      Calamity loans to be immediately available to businesses/MSMEs within 45 days

·      Mandatory insurance: all-risk insurance/national catastrophe insurance

·      Agencies involved in livelihood must have cluster fund

Best Practice:

·      Data backup, data storage in the cloud and other systems.

·      Over-preparation.

·      Interventions are pre-determined, specific to locations and occupations/livelihoods

Issues:

·      Business safety

·      Clear organizational structure (and coordination) down to the grassroots level

·      Recommendations for cluster approach in a pre-disaster scenario:

·      Inclusion of law enforcement (AFP, PNP) in the Livelihood cluster

·      Proper use of calamity fund

·      Coordination

·      Contingency Planning

·      Budgeting Program of LGU

Major issues in securing livelihoods and minimizing losses:

·     Businesses/livelihoods (farming, fishing, sales) have no all-risk insurance

·     Unclear structure for coordination in disaster preparation at all levels of governance

On the cluster approach in pre-disaster

·     “The recently conducted contingency planning workshop recommends that cluster approach is more effective as a pre-disaster response than any other approach.”

·     “The ICS (Incident Command System) is now being discussed in related workshops. It is lifted in many ways from the US Department of Agriculture”

·     “Study further the Cluster approach, as opposed to other approaches like the ICS”

WORKSHOP 2: Unsustainability of livelihood projects (with respect to pricing, identification of target markets, and accessibility to sources of raw materials)

·   Lack of livelihood in resettlement

·   Livelihood matching

These were validated by the forum participants, and more issues were raised:

·   Safety of livelihood and security of businesses

·   Access to raw materials and financing

·   Absorptive capacity of the economy (markets)

·   Lack of employable skills and productive technology (e.g. raising of organic swine)

·   A disconnect from ecosystems to livelihood to disaster

·   Lack of processing of raw materials

·   Businesses cannot meet requirements of locators (e.g. due to lack of Infrastructure like sea ports)

·   Problem in government support (Basey irrigation not fully funded)

·   Lack of Gender Analysis

·   Output contraction of agriculture and fisheries

Identified Issue: Sustainability of Livelihood for enterprise development (in rehabilitation projects)

Agency response:

·   Support to needs assessment

·   Support to rehabilitation plan

·   Capacity building and technical assistance to beneficiaries

·   Support establishing linkages: market, funding, TAs

·   Support to M and E

·   Impact of the Response

·   Active involvement of the community

·   Knowledge and skills acquired

·   LGUs were able to mobilize resources

·   Increased ownership of livelihood

·   Improved production of associations

What can be improved?

·   Capability Building (Regular Skills Training)

·   Integrating gender perspectives

·   Identification of product champion

·   Well-coordinated assessments and consultations

Approaches that need to be strengthened:

·   Sustained monitoring

·   Securing an FDA-LTO (license to operate)

·   Insurance for livelihood projects

·   Gender-responsive value chain analysis

·   Enforcement of the Magna Carta for SMEs

Other observations:

·   It is difficult for a livelihood venture to penetrate bigger markets because it has no FDA-LTO. Is there anyone who can help MSMEs get FDA-LTO?

·   Is there anyone who can help get insurance (all-risk) for the fishers, farmers and MSMEs (e.g. sari-sari store)?

·   Farmers are made to plant cash crops. When harvest time comes, there is oversupply in the market, hence, bringing down prices. Can agencies study the market first before identifying the crops to plant (and how much)?

Identified Issue: Unsustainability of rehabilitation projects (farming, spoilage of crops, etc)

Agency response:

·   Linkage to specific line agencies

·   Planned/schedules planting of crops based on market

·   Organized/clustered farmers

·   Social preparation

·   LGU is engaged in project implementation

·   Training and orientation to beneficiaries

Impact of response

·   Increased awareness

·   Accessible support to government agencies

·   Sense of ownership strengthened

·   Values formation

What can be improved?

·   Market database of crops (demand and supply)

·   Empowering/sense of ownership for beneficiaries

·   Monitoring efforts

·   Coordinate with LGU (including the barangays)

Approaches that need to be strengthened:

·   Systems approach to farming

·   Value chain approach in developing an economic sector

·   M and E

Other observations:

·   Social preparation must be part of any livelihood rehabilitation project. Value formation must be included

·   When farmers plant and find out that there is no market for their harvest, they will no longer trust government and agencies. When the latter returns to encourage farmers to plant again, farmers will not follow anymore.

Identified Issue: Sustainability of livelihood projects; and the lack of livelihood in resettlement sites

Agency response:

·   Coconut replanting, fertilization

·   Intercropping (with coconuts)

·   Provision of farm inputs

·   Trainings

·   Low-cost loans

·   Linkages

·   Post-harvest technology

·   Impact of response

·   Community empowerment

·   Employment

·   Organizational set-up strengthened

·   Additional income

·   Market opportunities

What can be improved?

·   Basic social preparation for community-based livelihood

·   Mindset (behavioral change)

·   Proactive engagement of LGUs and the Chamber (should approach the producers)

·   Upgrading the technology

·   Marketing support

Approaches to be strengthened:

·   Barangay assemblies must be intensified

·   Values formation/reorientation

·   Project sense of ownership

·   Coordination meetings

·   M and E

Other observations:

·   The MSMEs’ entrepreneurial skills must be developed

·   Market support is lacking; marketing the products is a problem

·   How can we help MSMEs become less reliance/dependent on government subsidies?

WORKSHOP 3: Project site visit reflection
TAPS — sole proprietorship, a Bahandi awardee, processor of banig (tikog)-based handicrafts.

·   TAPS participates in exhibits and trade fair, with the help of DTI. In various occasions, it displays its products in schools and government agencies

·   Its main source of raw materials/tikog is in Tolosa. Tikog grows in the wild, but TAPS is planning to cultivate tikog in Tanauan.

·   It accepts orders of souvenir items, customized to the needs of clients. It is now exploring on new designs.

·   It has 10 regular employees who are paid on a daily basis

·   They want to benchmark not only with Basey tikog industry but with similar others in various places

·   The factory is located in a two-storey house.

·   The workers are already registered in DOLE but they claim that nobody is helping them. They are on their own.

Identified project implementation issues:

·   Sustainability of the supply of raw materials (tikog)

·   Capability building for both farmers and processors

·   Low compensation of employees

·   Need to expand the market

Lessons learned:

·   Cultivate tikog (plantation)

·   Benchmark in Basey and other towns

·   Pakyaw system instead of daily wage will improve incomes of workers

Best practices:

·   Customized products

·   Utilization of indigenous materials

·   Organized local farmers

·   Exploring new product designs to meet changing market demand

·   Attendance in trade fairs

Open Forum (Questions):

·   Has there been support from the LGU in terms of access to financial support to the group? And what linkages did the group have in terms of marketing? There is no Tikog Development Plan in the town. Maybe because tikog is not a priority industry.

·   Instead of getting raw materials from Alang-alang, why not get these materials from nearby towns? TAPS will cultivate tikog locally.

·   How was the Tikog business before and after Yolanda? TAPS is much better now than it was before Yolanda. Due to various assistance, it has restored the business. For two months after Yolanda, the business was struggling. Today, more orders are coming in, and TAPS hopes to enter the export market. It has developed linkages, and has regular buyers already. TAPS is willing to share its knowledge and train others upon request.

Additional Comments/suggestions from the floor:

·   We observed that there are 2 levels of production that need support: Community level and factory level

·   Marketing problem is based on the fact that we would want the worker to have higher incomes. If they explore other markets, they will gain higher income.

·   If we want to increase the income in the community level, why would we not want the individual weavers to produce their own finished goods instead of passing these semi-finished goods over to TAPS who is a processor-consolidator-trader?

·   Since there are only 10 workers, there would be times when TAPS could not meet the demand of customers. Solution: Outsource weavers from Basey and transporting the finished products back to Tanauan.

·   Middlemen like TAPS, are needed/important.

·   TAPS has high demand for finished products but experiences inadequate supply of raw materials and semi-finished goods.

·   At the end of the site visit, CCD Credit Cooperative made known its interest to link/help TAPS!

SCWFA — The Sta Cruz Women Fishers Association was organized by JICA and DA. As a project, it started last 31 July 2014.

It has 20 members (19 females, 1 male). It is registered DOLE. Its first production of softbone bangus started with 30 kilos of bangus (raw materials). Its first capitalization was P6,000.

·   At one time in the past, they stopped the production due to a misunderstanding among members related to money matters. They believe that there is a large amount of collectibles. Fortunately, JICA came in between and served as mediator in order to pursue the project. They got a fresh capitalization of P10,000 (personal money of JICA staff) which they will pay only when they are able.

·   They have been tapped to train other women in 4 barangays in Basey, Samar on how to make softbone bangus. In the future, they plan to federate, get FDA-license to operate permit, and expand its membership.

Identified project implementation issues:

·   Marketing of softbone bangus

·   Organization and business management (declining membership)

Lessons learned:

·   Strong leadership; not to give up when business is failing

·   Few officers and members with sustained efforts were able to pull up the business back

·   Financial management is difficult; need for an adviser to guide the women’s group

Best practices:

·   Creation of management committees: purchasing, processing, marketing, bookkeeping

·   Each member looks for a market

·   Ability and willingness to transfer skills and knowledge to other women’s groups (Basey)

Other observations:

·   Production of softbone bangus is dependent on orders only. This practice will not maximize incomes of SCWFA members.

·   Participation in trade fairs help increase income but this is seasonal.

·   The SCWFA does not have problems with inputs (bangus) because there are a lot of fish pens/cages in the barangay which can supply their needs. The women’s husbands are fishers. Moreover, the women themselves know how to grow bangus. They are looking forward to owning at least 2 fishpens, with the help of government agencies.

 

Additional Comment/suggestion from the floor:

·   NEDA must facilitate a meeting with DTI to come up with a MOA to ensure SMEs access to supermarkets.(Ms. Grace Ty, PPDO-ES)

Conie’s Delicacies—Startedaround 2011, processing banana chips, cassava chips, and camote chips. Their main problembefore was its poor packaging. For 2 years, they were just using candles to seal the packages of chips that they wereselling.

Innovative plans and activities had direct support from DTI and DOST. New packaging of the products was introduced, andsales improved. Production is on a small-scale, as Connie’s is a family business. They have limited manpower (3 to 4 employees, 1 manager, and 6 on-call individuals).

 

·   The neighbors in the community do not patronize their products. There seems to be a problem with relationships withneighbors.

Identified issue:

·   Lack of supply of raw materials

·   Management style: limited to the family

·   Not receptive to expanding the business (wants to maintain it as a small family business)

·   Poor relationship with neighbors

Lessons learned:

·   “No man is an island” (Conie’s need to involve neighbors in the business)

·   Need to identify sources of raw materials

Best practices:

·   Better product packaging with DTI assistance

·   Diversify products (chips from other rootcrops)

·   Innovation: banana sticks which is made from the outer layer of the banana. This part, when made into chips, is hard to the bite.

Other observations:

·   Slow development of the different areas of business (5Ps of marketing)

·   NGOs assisted them financially, hence, was able to restore livelihoods after Yolanda

·   The owner does not involve community members as employees even though there is a dire need of manpower in the production process. He thinks of these people as threats (competitors) to the business as these people will penetrate and know the business’ ways and means, technology, etc. The owner has to be open-minded. He must realize the importance of his relationship with the community.

·   He and his business are not even recognized by his neighbors. These neighbors could not properly answer prospective customers who would want to visit his store because they do not exactly know where the place is.

·   The production area is sanitarily secured. Workers are using gloves, but we did not see them wearing hairnets.

Additional Comments/Suggestions from the floor:

·   In Guiuan, producers and traders of different products are placed in one center. And so, prices are regulated; there is a friendly competition. Why not do the same with Connie’s Delicacies. (Guiuan – LGU representative)

·   We talked with UP-ISSI and they said that FDA is interested to tie up with organizations that are supporting Yolanda-affected areas to conduct training for trainers on food safety and sanitation. (Ms Dolores Nuevas, GIZ)

Facilitator made a summary of the workshop outputs, and asked the question, “If we are going to make an intervention in projects similar to the three sites visited, how will project implementation be enhanced?”

 TAPS is a case where there is a high demand for finished products but there is an inadequate supply of raw materials and semi-finished goods.

·   Suggested interventions for enhancing project implementation:

+ Conduct of a Gender-responsive value chain analysis as basis for upgrading the economic sector

+ Encourage tikog plantation (local level)

+ Green the value chain

+ Monitor successes

 

 SCWFA is a case where inputs (bangus) are more than adequate but there is no market for the processed product, softbone bangus

·   Suggested interventions for enhancing project implementation:

+ Handhold the MSME until it gets an FDA-license to operate so that it can penetrate markets like Robinsons, Savemore, and Gaisano

+ An industry analysis is necessary in order to check the viability of softbone bangus. (In future interventions, an

industry analysis is a necessary requirement before introducing the project)

+ Advocate for a policy regarding the reduction of fees and relaxing requirements for MSMEs so that access to markets and access to finance becomes easier.

 Conie’s is a case where there is high demand but no stable supply of inputs, plus the fact that the owner is not keen about growing bigger in production capacity

·   Suggested interventions for enhancing project implementation:

+ Ensure sanitary preparation of the processed product (e.g.training on food safety and sanitation)

+ Marketing in tourism and pasalubong centers

+ Identification of sources of banana, cassava and camote and other rootcrops

+ Training on entrepreneurship and financial management

·   Additional comment from the floor:

+ How much income are they getting from the rehabilitation projects? What are our indicators that they already have a better condition? What are the measurable indicators that would tell us that they have completely recovered?

+ The forum participants agreed that this is one area which needs to be quantified. A localized tool for measuring the beneficiaries’ happiness index may likewise be in order.

WORKSHOP 4: WORKSHOP 4

·   What is the most urgent issue in the implementation of livelihood rehabilitation projects?

·   What is the most effective way to address the issue (innovative solution, lessons learned, best practices)

·   Are there policy implications on this issue?

Government-led interventions are slow. There is a need to/for:

·   Immediate release of funds

·   Review regulatory functions (e.g. licensing)

·   Technical assistance of government shall consider CC adaptation, must utilize research-based innovative approaches.

·   Make RDC truly functional, and reduce layers of bureaucratic procedures

·   Revisit convergence agencies (in terms of coverage and fund support)

Policy implication: timely / proactive implementation / application of policies

Sustainability of rehabilitation projects is the main concern.

There is a need to/for:

·   Values formation (sense of ownership of the beneficiaries)

·   Market and supply linkaging

·   Mandatory insurance

·   Continued capdev

·   Entrepreneurial mind-setting and skills training

·   Transfer of technology

Policy implication: special window for MSMEs (e.g. FDA-LTO), measurable indicators for economic well-being

Upgrading the value chain of the sector is important: from raw material provision, to production, and marketing.

There is a need to/for:

·   Identification of areas for growing the inputs

·   Provision of capital to producers

·   Identification of markets

Policy implication: low-cost loans (long term), strengthening One Town One Product (OTOP), requirement compliance facilitation with the help of responders/agencies

 

 

IMPRESSIONS/LEARNINGS FROM THE ACTIVITY

·   “There’s a need to be in touch with everyone, so that the interest will be sustained, and so we will know what each one is doing.” (Melchor Palmares, PLAN)

The Secretariat responded with a promise to provide the participants with a directory of those who came to this sharing forum. For those interested on the results of the forum (i.e., documentation), a copy will be sent to their email addresses.

·   “All these issues must be shared, results must be disseminated, and then determine what all those agencies concerned must do to address these. Get feedbacks from agencies concerned i.e, those in the Livelihood Cluster and those implementing Rehabilitation projects.”(Ms. Grace Ty, PPDO- ES)

NEXT STEPS

·   The sustainability of the group and the sharing session/venue for sharing and discussion was raised.

·   Possible next steps to address this concern

·   Organize a core group out of this group

·   Share contact numbers

·   Identify areas for collaboration

·   Attend Monthly Recovery Partners’ Meeting

·   ADB to provide/share the Workshop outputs

·   Conduct a follow-up activity linking with bigger industries

·   Create a Yahoo group and FB account for continued sharing of experiences and learnings

 

Annex 7: List of Readings/References

  • 2015 Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (CoP21)
  • Sendai Framework
  • 17 Social Development Goals
  • National DRRM Plan; Regional DRRM Plan
  • RA 10121; Sunset Review of RA 10121
  • Paris Climate Summit 2015
  • ADB Regional Knowledge Sharing Sessions Proceedings
  • UNRC Reports, Government Cluster Reports (NEDA, DSWD, DOST, DILG, DPWH, OCD)
  • Brookings and IOM Report: Post-Disaster Displacement: Insights from the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)
  • 2011-2016 ADB Country Partnership Strategy
  • Grant Implementation Manual: Republic of the Philippines: Emergency Assistance and Early Recovery for Poor Municipalities Affected by Typhoon Yolanda
  • 2012-2018 UNDAF for the Philippines
  • Home Sweet Home: Housing practices and tools that support durable solutions for urban IDPs
  • OCD Reports, OCD Region8

 

 

Bibliography

Angela Sherwood, Megan Bradley, Lorenza Rossi, Rufa Guiam and Bradley Mellicker. 2015. Resolving Post-Disaster Displacement: Insights from the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). Washington, DC; Geneva, Switzerland: Brookings Institution and IOM.

Congress of the Philippines. 2009. “RA 10121.” National DRRM Law. July 27. http://www.ndrrmc.gov.ph/attachments/article/45/Republic_Act_10121.pdf.

Department of Public Works and Highways. 2015. Typhoon Yolanda Rehabilitation and Recovery – Infrastructure Cluster. Powerpoint Presentation, Manila: DPWH.

Florencio Abad. 2015. Funding the Yolanda Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Program. Powerpoint Presentation, Manila: Department of Budget and Management.

Gupta, Huma. 2015. Home Sweet Home – Housing Practices and tools that support durable solutions for urban IDPs. Geneva: International Displacement Monitoring Centre.

Jacobs, Alex and Yates, Roger. 2013. 10 lessons for NGOs responding to Typhoon Haiyan. November 12. http://ngoperformance.org/2013/11/13/10-lessons-for-ngos-responding-to-typhoon-haiyan/.

Jacobs, Alex. 2015. Lessons from Haiyan: five steps to improve accountability to affected people. January 22. http://ngoperformance.org/2015/01/22/lessons-from-haiyan-five-steps-to-improve-accountability-to-affected-people/.

National Housing Authority. 3025. Typhoon “Yolanda” Permanent Housing Program. Powerpoint Presentation, Quezon City: NHA.

NEDA. walang petsa. “Typhoon Yolanda Updates.” NEDA Region 8. Na-access January 3, 2016. http://yolanda.neda.gov.ph/#tab-9e19f31449de39c3dc7.

—. 2013. “Yolanda Updates.” NEDA. December 13. Na-access January 4, 2016. http://yolanda.neda.gov.ph/#tab-e59385a1048585ba482.

OCD. 2016. Home. January 20. https://trainingalphasite.wordpress.com/.

Office of the President. 2013. “Memorandum Order No. 62, s. 2013.” Official Gazette. December 6. http://www.gov.ph/2013/12/06/memorandum-order-no-62-s-2013/.

—. 2015. Memorandum Order No. 79, s. 2015. April 22. http://www.gov.ph/2015/04/22/memorandum-order-no-79-s-2015/.

Official Gazette. 2014. “Administrative Order No. 44, s. 2014.” Official Gazette. October 28. Na-access January 3, 2016. http://www.gov.ph/2014/10/28/administrative-order-no-44-s-2014/.

UNRCO. 2015. Exit Planning Workshop Outputs. Tacloban: UNRCO Tacloban, 3-4.

UNRCO. 2015. Notes on Meeting-27 July 2015. Tacloban: UNRCO Tacloban.

Vilma Cabrera. 2015. Yolanda Recovery and Rehabilitation Efforts. Powerpoint Presentation, Quezon City: Department of Social Welfare and Development.

Zenaida C. Maglaya. 2015. Livelihood Cluster Accomplishments and Ongoing Activities. Powerpoint Presentation, Makati: DTI.

 

[1] Interview with OCD staff.

[2] NEDA is responsible for outcome monitoring of all government projects. But as Chair of the Sub-Committee on Rehabilitation and Recovery under RA 10121 (NDRRM Law), NEDA coordinates and monitors disaster-related projects. Memo 62 took these functions from NEDA to OPARR; Memo 79 assigned these functions back to NEDA from OPARR.

[3]Level 3 emergencies are considered “system-wide” emergencies that require mobilization of human resources and logistical, financial and coordination capacities beyond that which is normally deployed or otherwise made available in an emergency response and drawing on resources from a global level.

[4] See World Bank, “Kim announces new planned funding for Filipinos hit by Typhoon Haiyan” press release on 14 July 2014, available from www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2014/07/14/kim-announces-new-planned-funding-for-filipinos-hit-by-typhoonhaiyan (accessed 6 December 2015); Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan): Asian Development Bank Assistance (Asian Development Bank) available from www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/154518/typhoon-yolanda-haiyan-adb-assistance.pdf (accessed 6 December 2015).

[5] Aside from CRRP, whose formulation was facilitated by OPARR, two other Yolanda-related reconstruction plans have earlier been adopted by the government: (1) the Reconstruction Assistance for Yolanda, or RAY1, and (2) Implementation for Results (RAY2). Both RAY and RAY2 were principally developed by DILG and NEDA.

[6]Since the HUDCC had no office in Region 8, the National Housing Authority (NHA) often took its place during Cluster Meetings.

[7]The IASC Framework refers to “durable solutions” where the Philippine DRM framework talks about rehabilitation and recovery.

[8] The key element of government definition of permanent shelter was that the unit must be able to withstand a 250 km per hour typhoon, and for which its design should be approved by DPWH. Thus permanent housing units that may be counted as such by international organizations may not be viewed in the same category by the government.

[9]  In support of the government, at least 29 NGOs/INGOs were able to put up shelter projects in Region 8. (Please see Annex 5e.)

[10] The Liaison Team, led by UNICEF Field Office Chief Maulid Warfa, advocated for the transition of the Partners’ Meeting from being UN-led to government-led on the basis of the following principles:

(a) The role of the UN is to support and build government capacity to lead and coordinate, rather than to substitute for that capacity. (Guidance Note on Early Recovery, UNDP, 2008); and (b) The aim is to ensure the response is tailored to the local context and needs and allows for hand-over to national structures as soon as possible. (Handy Guide on UN Coherence, UNICEF 2015).

[11] During the Exit Planning Workshop, participants also recognized the need for establishing a cluster dedicated to environment.

[12] From media interviews with Panfilo Lacson, for head of the OPARR.

[13] Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.

[14] Taking into account ongoing World Trade Organization negotiations, the Doha Development Agenda and the Hong Kong ministerial mandate.

[15] DPWH has funding requirement of Php12.6B, Php4.5 of which have been funding. For RAY 1 and 2, total funding requirement is Php854M, all of which have been funded. A proposed RAY 3 (local roads and bridges, consisting of 480 projects) requires an indicative total budget of Php3.5B.

[16]Includes Skills Training, Community Capacity Building, Agriculture, Micro-enterprise, Market Development, CBP

[17]Includes Nutrition, WASH, Women and Gender, Education, Psycho-Social, Child Protection, Protection/Human Rights, Health, Church Strengthening, Advocacy.

[18] This list of non-government agencies is not complete. Included here are only those that responded to UNRCO’s request to share data about their projects in Yolanda and Ruby-affected areas.

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